HOW TO: redirecting NS (CNAME?) from www.abc.com to www.sites.google.com/site/...

Hi there,

I have a  domain and can configure the NS as I want. I want to have it pointing to a web space I have with gmail/google (google sites). The URL would be like "hhtp://sites.google.com/site/blablabla". I tried CNAME but is seems it does not work for a whole path. What would I have to do?

Cheers

Christine
DistributedServicesAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
pwindellCommented:
Ok. I just saw that you gave the link to the page. When I opened it and expanded the Part you did not expand it says this:

Sites created through Google Apps can only be mapped to a custom URL by the administrator for the Google Apps account. If you are an administrator, you can map a site to your Apps URL ("AppsDomain.com" in the example above) through the Google Apps control panel:

   1. Click Sites in the Google Apps control panel.
   2. On the Sites Settings page, select the Web address mapping tab.
   3. Click Add a new web address.
   4. Enter the name of the site you want to map to your Apps URL ("yoursite" in the example above).
   5. In the Web Address field, enter the sub-domain you'd like to map the site to. (For example, if you want to map your site to "www.AppsDomain.com", the sub-domain would be "www".)
   6. Select Add mapping and follow the instructions provided.

You might have to wait up to 24 hours to see your changes.


There,...that is what you are supposed to do.  It may not appear so on the surface because Google hides what they are really doing behind the scenes,...but behind the scenes it is doing exactly what I said they need to do,...and it is Google doing it, like I said,...even if it does not match my every detail due to their proprietary methods.
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farzanjCommented:
Redirecting is not done through DNS.  It is done through your web server (Apache) or through Javascript or any other active page -- ASP or PHP depending upon what you have and what you want to use.  What OS are you using?
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Jagadishwor DulalBraces MediaCommented:
Try using module rewrite using a htaccess file.
REF:
http://www.seocompany.ca/seo/url-redirect.html
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DistributedServicesAuthor Commented:
@farzanj:
And what CNAME on my NS for?
Even Goggle sites mentions the use of CNAME
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pwindellCommented:
Addition to jagadishdulal comment:
It can also be just a simple HTTP Redirect in the "default" http document of the Root Folder.  There is also an ASP counterpart that does the same ting in ASP Classic, and I'm sure PHP and ASP.Net have similar functions.

To DistributedServices:
You can't use a CNAME unless the DNS Server you create the CNAME on also controls the target Zone.  Even besides that a CNAME must point to a Host Record and a Host Record points to a Host Name which is a single-word name with NO dots,...it does not, and cannot,  point to a FQDN or a URL.   For a more detailed answer than that you would have to show us exactly what Google is saying in the exact context that they are saying it in order to know if you are reading or interpreting it out of context.

If the target is represented by www.sites.google.com/site then that is not even a true Site,...what it is, is a Virtual Folder under the Google Site of "sites.google.com".  If it were a true Site then it would be either www.mysite.com or if it was a Sub Domain of Google then it would be mysite.google.com,...but anytime it is listed on the right after the first "single-slash" then it is nothing but a Virtual Folder under the site with the Site being define by what is between the "double-slash" and the first "single-slash"

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farzanjCommented:
"A CNAME record or Canonical Name record is a type of resource record in the Domain Name System (DNS) that specifies that the domain name is an alias of another, canonical domain name. This helps when running multiple services (like an FTP and a webserver; each running on different ports) from a single IP address. Each service can then have its own entry in DNS (like ftp.example.com. and www.example.com.). Network administrators also use CNAMEs when running multiple HTTP servers on the same port, with different names, on the same physical host."
REF: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CNAME_record

You are looking for some kind of redirection -- 301 or 302.

I don't know your Operating system so I can't tell you how you should do it.  In Linux/Unix you can do it using Apache web server or on client side you can simply use Javascript or PHP or something of that nature.
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pwindellCommented:
Wiki is a little off.  It is not domain name is an alias of another,...but host name is an alias of another.  Yes in the end a Host Name is part of a Domain Name which combined together create a FQDN,...but the CNAME Record "aliases" a Host (A) Record.
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DistributedServicesAuthor Commented:
@farzanj and @pwindell;
Please check: http://sites.google.com/support/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=99448
and picture attached.
 I can enter the Domain at Google sites Here is what Google writes about CNAME
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DistributedServicesAuthor Commented:
no ideas?
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pwindellCommented:
No ideas?  You've been given the correct information several times from several viewpoints.
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pwindellCommented:
Let's go back to the beginning:

Your screen shots are useless:
1. You blocked out the real name.  This is supposed to be a public Site,...hence people are supposed to know what it is,...blotting it out is counter productive, and makes trying to solve anything a guessing game.
2. The only relevant part of the page,... you failed to expand,..so we don't know what Google has to say about it  (+ Sites through Google Apps).

www.abc.com
this is a valid Site FQDN

www.sites.google.com/site/  
This is NOT a valid Site FQDN.  This is a site sitting in a Subfolder of someone else's Site FQDN.  CNAMEs can NOT point to a URL,...they point to Host Records,...and a Host Record is a single-word name with NO DOTS,...the Zone Name is appended to it to create the FQDN.

Unless there is some new and unexpected surprise information in the part of that document that you did not expand,...the only way you are going to do this properly is to have Google,...who is the Site Hoster,...to present the site in a proper FQDN,...this means that they must be the authorittive DNS and they must configure it correctly.
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