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Osi model and access point/router

apart from a wireless router include an access point,swtich and router and an access point allows users to connect to other users in a network.

whats other difference are between an access point an a router, what parts of the OSI model do they work

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mc87
Asked:
mc87
3 Solutions
 
itnetworknCommented:
Historically, if an access point does not do any routing or is not capable of doing it then it works at the Data Link and Physical layer (layers 1 and 2). If a routing protocol like BGP, IGRP, OSPF, etc. is being used then it is working at the Network layer which is layer 3.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/2158503/Osi-Model-Complete

http://www.tomax7.com/aplus/osi_model.htm - Older webpage, but it still illustrates the point.
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mc87Author Commented:
what about the router does that work at the physical layer?
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x3manCommented:
AP's work at layer 1 and 2 of osi model. Routers work at layer 3. Very basic description of some of the differences here: http://www.techwarelabs.com/articles/other/routervsap/
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
>what about the router does that work at the physical layer?

I've never seen a router (or bridge or switch) that doesn't have physical layer capability.
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itnetworknCommented:
Read the description of the Physical Layer. A physical network cable being connected to a switch or power being turned off on a switch would be an example of something working and/or failing at the Physical Layer. Look at the links, and look at the examples it gives you. Let me know if you have any questions, I'll be happy to assist.
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rfc1180Commented:
Actually, a router operates at all layers of the OSI model depending on the type of communications exists. A router provides layer 3 services (IP Routing). a wireless bridge (AP [access point]) operates at layer 1 and 2, if the bridge provides IP connectivity or any type of routing, then it also operates at layer 3; additionally, if it offers any type of connectiivty for management, is provides services such as telnet/http and therefore, can operate at all layers of the OSI model.

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itnetworknCommented:
It looks like we are saying pretty much the same thing. The last comment about connectivity for management I think is getting away from the original question. If a router, AP, etc performs routing then it also works at Layer 3. If you use telnet to connect to it then that is a Layer 7 protocol, but that is not the function of the router. In other words, it does not need to operate at Layer 7 for it to serve it's purpose of performing your network routing.

To review your original question, the difference between a router, and an access point is that a router will perform routing which is a layer 3 function. If the AP performs routing then it is also works at layer 3.

Let me know if we can help further.
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rfc1180Commented:
>The last comment about connectivity for management I think is getting away from the original question
not really, if you consider what the question was "whats other difference are between an access point an a router, what parts of the OSI model do they work"; more specifically, "what parts of the OSI model do they work" Covers the answer I provided with a deeper dive that what has already been provided. I think it is important to understand that a router is nothing more than a computer that has IP forwarding enabled. As already stated, a router provides layer 3 services, and depending on what services are enable can operate at all layers of the OSI model.
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itnetworknCommented:
I understand what you are saying, but you can also say the same thing about an AP that can be connected for management with https, http, telnet, ssh, etc. This is only for management, and does not cover what function it serves in my opinion. Adding that to the equation to me confuses the point of "What is the difference between an AP or Router?".

I do like your analogy that it is nothing more then a computer. By definition that is correct.
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rfc1180Commented:
>but you can also say the same thing about an AP that can be connected for management with https, http, telnet, ssh, etc.

absolutely!

For the sake of others that may not know and directed specifically to you;

As far as what is the difference between an AP and a router lies within the primary Protocol Data Unit (PDU) that the device functions with, not the layers the devices reside in. The primary PDU an AP functions with is a 802.11 frame, an AP bridges 2 or more interfaces  interfaces (Radio interface [802.11] and Ethernet interface(s) [802.3]); bridging is a layer 2 function. The primary PDU for a router is an IPv4/6 packet, once the router receives a frame, it will de-encapsulate the IP packet, parse the destination IP and then perform a routing table lookup for the destination address, then forward the IP out an interface that matches the destination (Of course if one exists, if not, it is dropped); IP routing is a layer function. So it would be more appropriate in saying bridging operates at layer 2 and IP routing functions at layer 3 rather the devices performing at a specific layer of the OSI model. Maybe I am providing too much of detailed information for a non-detailed question.

Billy
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QlemoC++ DeveloperCommented:
This question has been classified as abandoned and is closed as part of the Cleanup Program. See the recommendation for more details.
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rfc1180Commented:

For the sake of others that may not know and directed specifically to you;

That must have sounded like I was coming off a bit wrong, a not was supposed to be included in that statement:

For the sake of others that may not know and not directed specifically to you

sorry if that sounded a bit harsh, that was not my intent.

Billy
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itnetworknCommented:
Reading your reply now Billy. No worries, we're just trying to help answer questions. No offense taken, and none meant on my part either.
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