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RAID 15 versus RAID 10

I configured a new HP server with 8 drives and an Array p410i controller.  I setup two drives RAID 1 so that if one failed i would still have the OS running.  The remaining 6 drives I configured RAID 5 because the utility gave me an option RAID 5 or RAID 1. Should I have configured as RAID 10 vs. RAID 15?  Is performance going to be an issue?

Also, last week, I had drive failure on the RAID 1 (OS).  I assumed if I lost one drive that I would still be functioning but the server would not boot.   I reset the drive and it rebuilt and everything came back up fine.  However, I have no confidence in this configuration.  The server is not in production yet but my intent was to make it the the role domain controller, which I still like to refer to as PDC even though there is no such thing in W2k8 anymore, and simply use as a File sharing print server.  What would be the ideal config using the Array controller and drives that I have?
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cobmo
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cobmo
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1 Solution
 
andyalderSaggar makers bottom knockerCommented:
Your config is fine, RAID 10 is faster than RAID 5 for writing but fileserver is more read than write anyway.
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cobmoIT ManagerAuthor Commented:
What is the logic on the RAID 1 side where one drive failed and the other didnt maintain the OS?  Thats not acting properly is it?
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andyalderSaggar makers bottom knockerCommented:
There can be problems if you reboot during a rebuild, I think it's because while it's rebuilding it isn't as fast. Powering off if there's a faulty disk should always be avoided although sometimes can't be helped. Also never fit a replacement disk with the server powered off as that sometimes confuses the controller, they like the disks to be hot-plugged.

By the way, you've put RAID 15, there isn't such a thing. It used to be the most common configuration RAID 1 for OS and RAID 5 for rest of data as you have it; RAID 1 for OS and RAID 10 for data is becoming more common due to disks being so much bigger now.
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cobmoIT ManagerAuthor Commented:
My misunderstanding then.  The array controller allowed me to configure two drives RAID 1 and then the reamining drives the software gave me a choice af RAID 5 OR RAID 1 but not 10.  Thats why i assumed RAID 1 + RAID 0 but its two separate logical drives.  I should stick with RAID 5 on the second logical drive then?

Also, when the drive failed in the RAID 1 config, I did leave the server on and pull the failed drive out and then reseat it.  It started rebuidling right away.  BUT the initial drive failure crashed the server.  it wouldnt boot to the OS.
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andyalderSaggar makers bottom knockerCommented:
HP have probably changed the terminology that they use again, but if you make an array of 6 drives and then create a logical disk on them by selecting RAID1 (or RAID 10) then it's RAID 10 whatever the GUI says. It always used to be that if you had just 2 disks it called it RAID 10 even though it was really RAID 1. I wouldn't worry about the terms they use, if half the disks space is used for parity it's RAID 10 whatever the GUI calls it.

Crashing when a drive fails is very rare, perhaps something happened that caused both the crash and the disk failure. First thing I would suspect is flakey mains or cheap UPS, either could cause the server to crash and the controller to hang which may make it indicate a disk fault when there wasn't a disk fault. I don't think it is a firmware bug although I would put the latest on anyway as it's a new installation - best get it over and done with - just download the latest firmware CD from HP's web.
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