What's the salary of a CCNA holder

Hello,

I want to know what's the salary of a CCNA Holder in the United States, like in New York, Maryland & Delaware, the average anyway.

Thank yo
david875Asked:
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BLEEPINGNETWORKCommented:
I really depends on the company, size and or lvl of resposability, and the over all job market. the guys in my office make around 120k
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MikeKaneCommented:
What state are you in?    We make about 60% of that in SouthEast US....  
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david875Author Commented:
I'm going to move to Delaware but if i find a good salary in New York i'll move on so.

What do you mean with 60% ?? I need salary numbers in dollars, how much does a CCNA holder make a month based on your experience.
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SouljaCommented:
Too many factors to just throw a number out there. Depends on the company, location, your experience, what you negotiate, type of CCNA, ect, etc. Here Michigan, CCNA don't make crap, unless you have a CCNA Wireless or Voice, which are in more demand at the moment. In R&S, you need to have at least a CCNP to start seeing some real money, but experience is a huge factor also. I am making CCIE money though I only have a CCNP, but I have the experience to back it up.
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david875Author Commented:
ok, i'm a fresh CCNA, how much is the "don't make crap" ??
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SouljaCommented:
35 - 50k
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david875Author Commented:
it means, 2900 to 3000 a month? how about a new CCNP salary?
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SouljaCommented:
Depends, a new Ccnp can have many years of experience and knowledge,  but just be getting the certification.  I would guess 50 - 85k. More in some cases.
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david875Author Commented:
ok i see, i wanna others experts' opinion
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
A certification such as CCNA or CCNP is pretty much useless for salary determination purposes.  A cert at this level will not do much more than get you past HR. At that point, the real determination of ability is made.

That said, 30K - 100K is a range.
 
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MikeKaneCommented:
I meant 60% of what the 1st person posted.   We see about 60K-65K in the SE.   But that comes with lots of experience.     A paper CCNA, maybe 45-50K to start.  

Most of the time, you'll find placement agencies that want to contract you out instead of full time employment.  


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david875Author Commented:
@MikeKane:
Most of the time, you'll find placement agencies that want to contract you out instead of full time employment.  

Please can you explain me this, sounds interessting
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MikeKaneCommented:
If you've ever tried monster or careerbuilders, those sites are 80% of the ads for I.T. are recruiters trying to get your info in their databases.   Many times, companies only need tech help for a few months for a conversion, implementation, whatever.   Recruiters and Temp agencies will try to corner the market for these jobs by offering the candidates for the specific positions.   It's in their best interest to have as many people in their lists as possible.    I personally find it annoying that they flood the job sites with fake ads just to get you to fill out the forms, but whatever.  

Contract work is probably easier to get.    Companies don't have to pay payroll tax or provide benefits to contract workers.    For short term help, its cheaper for the company.   The upside is you can usually charge more for contract work.   The downside, its not permanent or steady work, and no benefits, no company heath ins. etc...    

With an agency, you can usually get some benefits through the agency, like health care, but you are an employee of the agency.  They get the contract and you get a check.   You end up not getting as much money, but get some purchasable benefits.   But you do get the potential for more work this way since agancies are called more often than headhunters.  


I've never gone the contract route too much.  I prefer a steady paycheck even though I don't earn as much as I could.  
 
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WissamSenior Network EngineerCommented:
I Know a CCNA person getting more than other CCIE's, the certificate is not the only thing that the salary would range for. Experience does reflect it more.
I beleive the best thing you do is to search job calculators that would give you an idea about the range in the corresponding state
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SouljaCommented:
@wpharoan

While your case may be true, I am sure it's a rare case at that. I bet this person has been with the same company for many years and just worked his way up the salary ladder. I am sure he would not be able to walk into another company demanding CCIE pay.
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david875Author Commented:
I agree with @Soulja, it might to happen that this person worked for the company for a longtime and he got experience that allow him to get a good salary, but as @Soulja said i don't expect him to get paid more than a CCNA holder if he come and apply for a position in my company for exemple.
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atlas_shudderedSr. Network EngineerCommented:
Soulja,

I work in the same state that you are in, as a CCNA and make just shy of 100k.  CCNA's are judged on three criteria in the state.  Experience (meaning what can you really do), Scope (meaning what can you really work with) and Peers (meaning, how well are you tied into the engineering community).

I've been full time into network engineering for the best part of 7 years and in that time, have not been offered a salary below 75k (at the beginning).  I currently get calls for positions between 95 and 115k regularly.  This state is pretty good at shredding the paper tigers very early on and given the massive drop in the number of technicians in the state, the pool gets smaller and those of us left are much more competive in the market.
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SouljaCommented:
@atlas

You are correct. Lately, the salaries have gone up due to the shortage of I.T. professionals in the states, so that is another of the many factors. Oh, and yes this state is good at "shredding the paper tigers". Haha!
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SouljaCommented:
Correction. I meant in this state.
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MikeKaneCommented:
They all must all be moving to Florida....  here the IT salaries are shrinking.   Too many techs, not enough work.  
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atlas_shudderedSr. Network EngineerCommented:
Mike

All you need to do to get things rolling the same direction as us is to experience a massive collapse in your housing market (what happened nationally was just a drop in the bucket compared to Michigan - average valuations on homes here have dropped 63% in the past 3 years and some 40% of mortaged homes are "underwater") and then find your largest economic sector and send 70% of it into "restructuring".  This will insure that your unemployment and cost of living spike, followed by a rapid exodus of detritus.  Of course it also means that you get to enjoy the unique statuses of 1.) 50% of high school graduates being illiterate, 2.) houses commonly selling for $1USD (not a typo), 3. being top ranked for crime and 4.) being ranked 5 consecutive years as being one of the worst states to live in.
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david875Author Commented:
i see, this is interessting, but even that you can't be broke, i mean CCNA is usefull anyway
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MikeKaneCommented:
Just to get back on topic....    I suppose a CCNA is valued differently in different areas, just like any skill.    Search for online job calculators, they illustrate what I mean since you have to specify an area before you get a salary estimate.  

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atlas_shudderedSr. Network EngineerCommented:
A couple of other notes of interest to this topic.  Since you are moving, be sure to evaluate the cost of living in the areas you are looking at.  100k sounds like a fair chunk of change to most folks but there are areas where it is little more than a McWage.  Places that come to mind are DC, LA, NYC, perhaps Dallas/Atlanta, especially if you are supporting a family.

Additionally, if you aren't currently doing the job and haven't done it before, don't run after it just because of the pay potential.  Network/cisco engineering can be a blast if you are into it and geek out on it, but if it isn't something you enjoy, it will be made manifest quickly and that can end up having much more drastic consequences beyond the earnings differences in the long run.  No amount of money can make up for an occupation you hate.

And finally, no, I am not broke.  I make a good wage but I also don't live like the majority of my neighbors (e.g., I just traded my 92 Accord in for an '07 Civic - not because I wanted to but because the economics of keeping the 92 on the road was almost as much as buying the newer vehicle).  That being said, yes, the CCNA is useful, as someone else pointed out above, to get past HR, but what really matters is the knowledge, skillset and ability more than anything.  I've interviewed many "network engineers" in the past and I'd say that it works out to about  1 in 5 that I actually buy off on.  All of them had CCNA's and most had only that.  cisco tests, as tricky as they may be, can still be dumped.  I have had guys interview with me that couldn't even tell me what the difference between a private and public address, much less identify the ranges - the most rudimentary of knowledge.
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david875Author Commented:
@atlas shuddered: thank you for your reply, of course i like this field, cisco make me excited when it's about troubleshooting something, verifying interfaces, IP address etc, well to proove you this, i can configure a frame-relay switch and make all the routes, this is something that you can see only in CCNP and up so i don't try to stick with what ccna materials provides me but in fact i try to add more knowledge day after day.
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atlas_shudderedSr. Network EngineerCommented:
I'd say distribute the points among respondents and then delete the poster's account.
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QlemoBatchelor, Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
This question has been classified as abandoned and is closed as part of the Cleanup Program. See the recommendation for more details.
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