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How can I get rid of the pixelated nonsense?

I've got a Photoshop doc that I've created that looks great on screen. Initially created it in CMYK at 300 dpi. When I go to print it, it looks pixelated. I've got the CS4 creative suite, so I want to believe I've got the tools necessary to do whatever needs to be done to be able to print a clean looking copy, but I don't know what to do.

Thoughts?
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brucegust
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brucegust
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4 Solutions
 
h3nnysCommented:
In what format did you save the file ? is it in the original psd format or .jpg ?

are you able to check the pixel measurements, if so, what are they ? Even though the document is at 300dpi, if the doc size is let say 100pixels wide then it will print out pixelated !

Let us start from there as it could be many things so let me know
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h3nnysCommented:
Also check the print settings and make sure that the print quality is set correctly :)
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avgavgCommented:
Click Image > Image Size and enter the actual size of the printout that you want in the width and height boxes in the Document Size section with inches selected as the unit of measurement in the list boxes next to width and height.

Make sure the Constrain Proportions and Resample Image check boxes are ticked (checked) and enter 300 in the resolution box (select pixels/inch from the list box).

For an A4 size paper, Document Size should be around 11 inches height x 8 inches width at 300 pixels/inch Resolution.

The image will look much larger on your monitor which usually has only around 75 pixels per inch resolution but will print in the correct size on paper.

Good Luck!
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David BruggeCommented:
@ avgavg

Depending on the size of the source material, your method could very likely end up with the pixelation that brucegus is seeing.

All common printers, when given a source file with a resolution smaller than the output, will fill in the gaps with an upsample algorithm in much the same way that your method describes.

While Photoshop might do a better job of "filling in the blanks," the difference will be not be all that significant.

My suspicion is the same as h3nnys'. That is, the source file is too small to print at the size that the author wants.
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avgavgCommented:
'a Photoshop doc that I've created'

D_Brugge:

If brucegust was creating a design or artwork from scratch - which appears to be a possibility - it would solve his problem.

brucegust:

Applying the same guidelines to any small image (should be in jpg format for best results) before u drag it into your artwork should reduce the pixellation significantly.

Of course, as D_Brugge has indicated, there is a limit to how much a small image can be enlarged before pixellation becomes evident.

Good Luck!
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David BruggeCommented:
@ avgavg

> If brucegust was creating a design or artwork from scratch - which appears to be a possibility - it would solve his problem.

Not if he created a small image to start with. Now I realize that it would have to be very small, but we don't know what "it looks pixelated" means so, until brucegust checks in with some more information, we're all shooting in the dark.

BTW, I didn't mean to jump your case about your solution. I'm just looking out for the novice that comes across articles in the Knowledge Base and thinks that you can take any size image and sample it up to poster size like they do in the movies. 'taint goin'a happen.
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avgavgCommented:
D_Brugge:

'BTW, I didn't mean to jump your case about your solution'

No such thoughts. I jumped in with the same assumptions and am also shooting in the dark!

Let's hope all of the above will help brucegust to solve his problem.

Cheerio!
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brucegustAuthor Commented:
Turns out that my original document was CMYK, but I made the mistake of setting its resolution to 72, which was a total drag in that I had to recreate the whole thing using a 300 dpi resolution. Once that was in place, we were gold!

Thanks for weighing in!
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