• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 913
  • Last Modified:

Route Traffic between two NICs on Windows XP

Hey all,

I'm not too good with configuring routing outside of Cisco products, and I've never done this in Windows. Here goes:

We have a PC that has two NICs installed. One NIC is on our primary network, and the PC has a static IP, and is also bound to Active Directory. The other NIC is on a separate network that monitors a specific piece of equipment at a remote location (it's sent over a "T1" via Microwave). This is the only device in the entire organization with access to the other network.

What I want to do is configure a APC UPS at the remote location with temperature monitoring. I want it to be able to e-mail and page me in the event that the temperature sensor reaches the specified thresholds, or if there is a power interruption.

Is there a way to pass traffic from 10.1.1.1 (device network) to 192.168.1.1 (main network) for traffic outside of that network? Can I set the Windows machine as the gateway for that specific network? Due to the location of the PC and the wiring, I can't configure another VLAN in the main router for passing the info back and forth (that would be easy!).

Thanks so much! I appreciate any help.
0
mattai
Asked:
mattai
  • 7
  • 7
1 Solution
 
sumandanCommented:
you could enable routing on the Windows XP..here is a pointer..

http://www.wikihow.com/Enable-Windows-XP-Routing


if you want to add static routes on the XP computer, you should use the command syntax.

route add <dest network> mask <netmask> gw <remote end ip>
0
 
akahanCommented:
It seems to me you could just bridge the two NICs on the XP machine.  You would go into Control Panel, Network Connections, hold down control and click on each of them (so they're both highlighted, then right-click, and choose "bridge connections."  By doing this, the XP machine acts as a network bridge between the two NICs (and the networks they're each connected to.)
0
 
mattaiAuthor Commented:
So in the bridged configuration, we have another PC on the other end attached to the network (10.1.1.0 network, 10.1.1.1 is PC 1 and 10.1.1.2 is PC 2 [with the two NICs]). Should I set the gateway for the PC on the other side to the IP of the PC that's acting as the network bridge?

0
Configuration Guide and Best Practices

Read the guide to learn how to orchestrate Data ONTAP, create application-consistent backups and enable fast recovery from NetApp storage snapshots. Version 9.5 also contains performance and scalability enhancements to meet the needs of the largest enterprise environments.

 
akahanCommented:
You would set it to the IP of the bridging PC, making sure to use that PC's right IP address, which would be the one on that side of the bridge... that is, the 10..1.1.2 address..
0
 
mattaiAuthor Commented:
So after bridging the networks on the machine that has both NICs, I can ping the main network (192.168.1.0), but I can't ping any devices on the 10.1.1.0 network. Is this expected behavior?
0
 
akahanCommented:
No.  Have you added 10.1.1.2 as a second default gateway on the machines on the 192.168.x..x network that need to access the 10.1.1.x network?
0
 
mattaiAuthor Commented:
So I'm still having problems using the bridge configuration in Windows XP. Perhaps I'm doing something wrong.

Just to confirm, here are the steps I performed:
1. I set the Office LAN NIC to a static configuration (IP: 192.168.1.105/24, Gateway: 192.168.1.1, and DNS 192.168.1.25).
2. I set the Management LAN NIC to a static configuration (IP/24: 10.1.1.1, no gateway, no DNS)
3. I bridge the two NICs.
4. I perform ping experiments (outlined below).

[b]
When I'm on the PC that is bridging the two networks:[/b]
I can ping any device on the "Office LAN" (192.168.1.0).
I can't ping any device on the "Management LAN" (10.1.1.0).

When I'm on another PC on the Office LAN:
When I try to ping the machine that's bridging the two networks from the Office LAN, I get no response. I've attached a PDF outlining our network topology (well the area in question), in case I've done something incorrect.

  NetDiagram.pdf
0
 
akahanCommented:
On PC NIC2, set the gateway to 192.168.1.105, and see if that brings any joy.

0
 
akahanCommented:
No, waitaminnit.

Regardless of gateway settings, etc, you should be able to ping anything in the 10.1.1.X network from the dual-nic LAN.  If not, then something's wrong with that leg of the network, and that needs to be fixed first, before you even think about bridging.

Are you sure the 10.1.1.X NIC is working, that there's no firewall, etc.?  (That is, if you completely disconnect NIC1, are you able to ping the other systems hanging off NIC2?  STEP ONE is to make sure you can ping the other systems hanging off NIC 2, before you try bridging the two networks...looks like something is not yet functional on your Management LAN.

0
 
mattaiAuthor Commented:
When I remove the bridge, I can ping the devices on NIC2 (Management LAN) and NIC1 (Office LAN). When I enable the bridge, it no longer can ping the devices on NIC2's side of the network. RE: NIC1 (post bridge config): I figured out what was going on. When you enable the bridge, it stops communicating on 192.168.1.105, and it obtained a new IP address for the bridge from my DHCP server. Once I set the bridge address to a different static IP I was fine pinging the machine from other devices on the network.

Steps up to this point:

1. I set the Office LAN NIC to a static configuration (IP: 192.168.1.105/24, Gateway: 192.168.1.1, and DNS 192.168.1.25).
2. I set the Management LAN NIC to a static configuration (IP: 10.1.1.1/16, no gateway, no DNS)
3. I bridge the two NICs.
4. Set Static IP for bridge (192.168.1.106/24).
5. I perform ping experiments (outlined below).

I  can ping any device on the Office LAN. Any device on the Office LAN can ping the IP of the bridge (step 4). Pinging  the original NIC1 IP (192.168.1.105) yields no response on either the PC performing the bridge, or any PC on the Office LAN.

I cannot ping any device on the Management LAN. Pinging  the original NIC2 IP (10.1.1.1) also yields no response using the PC performing the bridge.
0
 
mattaiAuthor Commented:
Of course I'm assuming that I can ping from the machine acting as the bridge after it's been configured. Maybe you can't?...

Do  I have to set another PC on the office LAN with a routing table that looks at the bridge as well, and then the bridge passes the traffic to the Management LAN?
0
 
akahanCommented:
Sorry, I'm now completely confused.

You say things like "I can ping the devices on NIC2..."   But from where?  From the bridged machine?  Or from machines on the other LAN?

No DHCP server had been mentioned previously at all.  Argh!

And now, I'm not sure what's working and what's not, since you say "Once I set the bridge address to a different static IP I was fine pinging the machine from other devices on the network."  Is the rest of your description of the scenario describing what's taking place after, or before this fix?

Finally... when you say you can and cannot ping various devices, where are you pinging from?

So, starting over, kind of...

Is there any reason the machines have to be on separate subnets?  I think the bridging will work a lot more easily if they're all on the same subnet.

So, you'd give one of the NIC's the IP address 192.168.1.1, as it has already, and give the other the IP address of 192.168.1.50 or whatever, and bridge the two of them, and give your digital exciter and APC addresses on the 192.168.1.X range.

Is there an external consideration that prevents you from doing that?
0
 
mattaiAuthor Commented:
Sorry, I'm now completely confused.

Sorry. Me too :(


You say things like "I can ping the devices on NIC2..."   But from where?  From the bridged machine?  Or from machines on the other LAN?


Before bridge: I can ping devices on either network using the machine with NIC1 and NIC2 (the future bridge).

After bridge: I can ping devices on the OFFICE LAN, but not the management LAN. I think this is because the "bridge" has an address on the Office LAN. I'm confident if I change the address of the bridge to 10.1.1.10 for instance, I'll be able to ping the devices on the Management LAN and not the Office LAN. See what I'm getting at?

I've tried to ping the original IP of the Office LAN (192.168.1.105) after bridge configuration, from both the machine that the bridge is hosted on, AND other machines in the LAN and I get no response. I also tried to ping the 10.1.1.1 address from the Bridged computer, and I get no response there either.

So what I've observed is this:
1. After the bridge is configured, both original IP addresses stop responding.
2. After the bridge is configured, it received an IP from my DHCP Server.
3. I set the Bridge Address to a different static IP (192.168.1.106).
4. USING the machine that's now the bridge, I can ping any device on the Office LAN. USING the machine that's now the bridge, I cannot ping any device on the management LAN. USING a different machine on the OFFICE LAN, I can ping the address of the bridge (.106). Attempts to ping the original IP addresses of the NICs in the bridge, however, yield no results. I've tried to ping both original IPs from the machine now acting as the bridge, and I've tried to ping the original Office LAN IP from another machine on the Office LAN. No response.


No DHCP server had been mentioned previously at all.  Argh!

Sorry-- I didn't think that would matter.

And now, I'm not sure what's working and what's not, since you say "Once I set the bridge address to a different static IP I was fine pinging the machine from other devices on the network."  Is the rest of your description of the scenario describing what's taking place after, or before this fix?

Finally... when you say you can and cannot ping various devices, where are you pinging from?

I think I covered this above.

So, starting over, kind of...

Is there any reason the machines have to be on separate subnets?  I think the bridging will work a lot more easily if they're all on the same subnet.

So, you'd give one of the NIC's the IP address 192.168.1.1, as it has already, and give the other the IP address of 192.168.1.50 or whatever, and bridge the two of them, and give your digital exciter and APC addresses on the 192.168.1.X range.

Is there an external consideration that prevents you from doing that?

No real reason, except I have to drive 5 miles down the road to the other location to reconfigure the IP/network settings. This network has been in place for about 11 years, and really only every had 2 devices total on it.. I was just keeping i the same for ease.

0
 
akahanCommented:
OK, I don't think the bridging is going to work if the IP address schemes are different.  The way this normally works is that you have a DHCP server on the network connected to one "leg" of the bridge; you activate the bridge, and then the DHCP server "sees" the other "leg," and issues DHCP addresses to the machines on the other leg as well.  Once the two NICs are both components of the network bridge, you wouldn't adjust either of their ip addresses, gateway addresses, etc., individually, you'd edit the network bridge's settings.

I'm going to try to duplicate here what you've got going and see what I find.  May take a bit of time.  Meanwhile, if someone else wants to jump in, they're more than welcome, as far as I'm concerned.



0
 
mattaiAuthor Commented:
I haven't had a chance to try this out yet, as my priorities have shifted, however, I'm fairly certain that what you're saying is correct, as I was thinking the same thing (re: network addresses being different). I'm going to accept your solution so the question doesn't go abandoned and you get the points/credit. Thanks for your help!
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: SSL Checker

Scans your site and returns information about your SSL implementation and certificate. Helpful for debugging and validating your SSL configuration.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

  • 7
  • 7
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now