Hidden network adapters in Windows 7

peea
peea used Ask the Experts™
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Hi Experts

I just upgraded my laptop to Windows 7, and am still not familiar with some new features of the latest OS, for me at least.

One thing I have noticed is that, there are a few hidden network adapters on my laptop, which are not shown in Control Panel | Network and Internet | Network Connections. However, I may see them from IPCONFIG /ALL result, as well as the Networks list given in Microsoft Network Monitor. (See below the Code and Image section)

What are they? Why are they hidden from Control Panel? Can I change their settings (e.g. removing IPv6)?

Kind regards,
P
Windows IP Configuration

   Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : ABCDE
   Primary Dns Suffix  . . . . . . . : domainname.net
   Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
   IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
   WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
   DNS Suffix Search List. . . . . . : domainname.net
   System Quarantine State . . . . . : Not Restricted


Wireless LAN adapter Wireless Network Connection:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : 
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft Virtual WiFi Miniport Adapter
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-26-C6-A1-4A-83
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Ethernet adapter Bluetooth Network Connection:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : 
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Bluetooth Device (Personal Area Network)
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-27-13-BA-4F-3C
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Wireless LAN adapter WLAN Connection:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : 
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel(R) WiFi Link 5100 AGN
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-26-C6-A1-4A-82
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.100.107(Preferred) 
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Monday, 16 May 2011 04:39:48
   Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Tuesday, 17 May 2011 14:17:30
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.100.1
   DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.100.1
   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.100.1
   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Ethernet adapter LAN Connection:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : 
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Broadcom NetLink (TM) Gigabit Ethernet
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : D8-D3-85-2F-D5-E1
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.100.104(Preferred) 
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Monday, 16 May 2011 14:15:02
   Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Tuesday, 17 May 2011 14:15:02
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.100.1
   DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.100.1
   DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.100.1
   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Ethernet adapter VMware Network Adapter VMnet1:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : 
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : VMware Virtual Ethernet Adapter for VMnet1
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-50-56-C0-00-01
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.206.1(Preferred) 
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 
   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Ethernet adapter VMware Network Adapter VMnet8:

   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : 
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : VMware Virtual Ethernet Adapter for VMnet8
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-50-56-C0-00-08
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
   IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.112.1(Preferred) 
   Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 
   NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Tunnel adapter isatap.{33B81C64-6BFA-4838-B933-1C767F411162}:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : 
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 18:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : 
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Tunnel adapter isatap.{C373CF0E-0974-442E-9834-8E453D65DF98}:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : 
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter #3
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Tunnel adapter isatap.{D3110AE5-5C10-474D-B055-89BC980AB508}:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : 
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter #4
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Tunnel adapter isatap.{F0C6A34E-8BB6-4AF9-8E99-EA3F89C525CF}:

   Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connection-specific DNS Suffix  . : 
   Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter #5
   Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
   DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
   Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

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NM34.Networks-List.PNG
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Dave BaldwinFixer of Problems
Most Valuable Expert 2014

Commented:
Some are just software interfaces, not 'real' adaptors.  I see them on all my Windows XP computers.  I wouldn't worry about them unless you have a real issue with one of them.

Author

Commented:
I would like to know why they are there, including the purposes and functions...

any clues??
Mike ThomasConsultant
Top Expert 2010

Commented:
Which ones specifically are you worried about? (save me going through your list) ?
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Mike ThomasConsultant
Top Expert 2010

Commented:
Actually I am going to assum you mean the Tunnel adapters?

Read Here

http://forums.techarena.in/windows-vista-network/918961.htm

And

http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7itpronetworking/thread/ffe23cc5-f3f9-4592-b1fb-37d98c9b4169/

You can also remove some/all by disabling IPV6 And by using Device Manager > select view / show hidden devices > scroll down to network adapters and uninstall them.

Author

Commented:
Thanks for the comments and links.

Actually, the most interesting one is "Local Area Connection* 18", not only because it is not visible like other Tunnel Adapters, but also for the star (*) marked in the connection name. Any special purpose and meaning??
Mike ThomasConsultant
Top Expert 2010

Commented:
Ah ok well that is there because you have IPV6 installed, that (non physical) Teredo Tunneling pseudo-interface allows non IPV6 traffic to be tunnelled over an IPV4 network......basically.

Author

Commented:
As I don't need to use IPv6, how can I remove IPv6 stack for that connection?

FYI - I have manually disabled (unchecked) IPv6 for other network connections. I just can't find somewhere to remove IPv6 for this pseudo interface..., as it seems not visible in Control Panel...

Thanks.
Consultant
Top Expert 2010
Commented:
It is pretty harmless but you can clean it up via a reg hack

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929852

I do this on servers but do not bother on clients, I guess I am just used to seeing the mess now. ;)

Author

Commented:
Thanks for the KB link giving the MS handy tools to disable IPv6.

Does "Disable IPv6" (50409) mean "Disable native IPv6 interfaces" (50411) plus "Disable tunnel IPv6 interfaces" (50412)??
Mike ThomasConsultant
Top Expert 2010

Commented:
The reg hack should disable everything, I never tried the tools I just edit the registry, you wont break anything  (except ipv6) so just use them all. ;)

Author

Commented:
Yes, all the hidden LAN connection and Tunnel Adapters are gone after running "Disable IPv6" (50409), of course, as well as IPv6 bindings.

That means all of them are IPv6 related.

It's now fixed. thanks so much.

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