Question regarding outlook calendar invite behavior

sheldondbrown
sheldondbrown used Ask the Experts™
on
Hello EE - I would like some assistance if possible.

We are in the middle of a migration.  Our exchange migration is done and there were some issues, mostly ironed out.  I have one problem listed below that I can't figure out how to resolve.



Here is a synopsis of what the user expected: (pre migration)

User receives an invite to a meeting.  She does not intend to be present at the meeting.
Outlook (by design) places the invite as "tentative" in her calendar if she does not explicitly responds.
User deletes invite while NOT making any response at all.
Corresponding "tentative" invite remains in calendar.


Here is a synopsis of what is happening now: (post migration)

User receives an invite to a meeting.  She does not intend to be present at the meeting.
Outlook (by design) places the invite as "tentative" in her calendar if she does not explicitly respond.
User deletes invite while NOT making any response at all.
Corresponding "tentative" invite is REMOVED from the calendar.

User is not exactly sure when this behavior started but the following things have changed since she remembers it last:

(premigration -> post migration)

Outlook 2007 -> Outlook 2007
Exchange 2003 -> Exchange 2010
AD 2003 -> AD 2010

We are running Windows XP SP3 on all of our workstations.  Neither the workstations nor the users have been migrated to AD 2010 yet.  There is a trust relationship between AD2003/AD2010 (the new Exchange server lives on 2010 / the workstations and most of the servers still live in AD2003.

The user would like to return Outlook post migration behavior BACK to pre-migration behavior.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
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Here is a synopsis of what the user expected: (pre migration)
User deletes invite while NOT making any response at all.
Corresponding "tentative" invite remains in calendar.


>> IMO, the above is not true
When the end-user deceides to delete any item @ calendar...that should go-away from the calendar.
Else...the delete is  should ne called as an un-successful deletion?


Author

Commented:
I would like to agree, but there were many little things that worked one way on Exchange 2003 and work differently on Exchange 2010. We tried to plan for most of them but I can't exactly tell the user she's incorrect about the behavior from before.  

If anyone has *any* insight as to how it should work - or how I might mimick that behavior, please comment.
Just in case if you are having any Outlook profiles available for E2k3 servers
....check if they are trying to hide the meeting-requests or complete delete the meeting-requests

> Any Addons @ Outlook with additional macro/menu? Did the end-user tried to delete the meeting-requests from any wireless device?
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Author

Commented:
The new Exchange server lives on Windows Server 2008.  Per the user, she isn't hiding any message requests. She claims to have literally deleted the request and have the tentative meeting remain in the calendar after doing so.

There is an add-in for our company CRM, but this has never had any effect on other functions of Outlook.  No, the user hasn't (to my knowledge) deleted meeting requests from her blackberry.  She receives many meeting requests and I don't think this would be practical (from her perspective).

Discovered the reason was related to her Outlook profile being somewhat corrupt.  Created a new one and tried again.  Meeting requests show as expected.

Author

Commented:
Solved my own issue.

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