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jeff_zucker
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Apache Virtual Hosting

I have Apache Virtual Hosting setup with a combination of dedicated and shared ips.  I woud like to install an ssl on one of the domains that's on the shared ip so I need to move it to a dedicated ip and add a 443 entry into the httpd.conf.

Is manually editing the httpd.conf the only way to do this?  It just seems messy to be going in there all the time to make changes like this.
Apache Web ServerLinux OS Dev

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Steve Bink

8/22/2022 - Mon
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gr8gonzo

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SOLUTION
Steve Bink

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gr8gonzo

@routinet,

After reading your summary, I'm not sure what you were disagreeing with? You're still creating a .conf file and using the Include directive to pull it in, which is what I was describing. Even though you're creating individual .conf files (and the creation is still a manual process), they are still treated as part of the main Apache configuration...
jeff_zucker

ASKER
Is the advantage to using include .conf files that if one has an error, it will just be ignored?
gr8gonzo

An error in an include conf file will be treated the same as an error in the main file.  The advantage of Includes is simply configuration management.
Your help has saved me hundreds of hours of internet surfing.
fblack61
Steve Bink

I was disagreeing with the idea that a series of conf files means you have to edit the main conf file.  The Include directive allows for compartmented configurations.  That means you can put a standard, default configuration in your main conf file, then use site-specific files to target particular configurations.  Since each site file should be encapsulated in a <VirtualHost> container, any error in it will impact only that particular site.

IMO, the original question was asking for the exact kind of configuration management that Include provides.  I just happen to disagree with the nuanced argument that editing an included conf file is equivalent to editing the main conf file.  Technically, sure...they are all read and parsed the same way.  Realistically, it is quite a difference to edit a single include vs. digging around in 1000+ lines of a consolidated httpd.conf.  

No worries...we both pointed the OP in the same (correct) direction.  I just like to-mah-to better.  :)