how to remove excel 2000/2003 password on sheet

trta911
trta911 used Ask the Experts™
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Hello, i have a file that is protected by strong password (to open and change). Is there a way, how to remove this password?
Thanx
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You will need a thord party password remover.

These generally work with a dictionary in the first instance and then brute force.  With the power of modern PCs, it might not take too long but years ago when I hard to use one, it took weeks.
Most Valuable Expert 2011
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Commented:
Hello,

You need to know the password to open the file in Excel, then click the Save As command. In that dialog select the Tools drop down > General Options. Delete the password and save the file.

If you don't know the password, then contact the author of the spreadsheet and ask them for it. That's the regular, legal approach.

Password cracking software is an alternative, but at EE we don't really support this approach.

cheers, teylyn
Hello,

1) Right-click on the sheet name tabs at the bottom (Sheet1, Sheet2, etc.) and click 'Unprotect Sheet'. Give existing password. This will remove protection for modification.

2) Copy or Move the Sheet/Sheets to a new Excel file and Save it (Using Save As). [The alternative way needs a lot more explanation :) ]

Now you will have a new file without any protection / password.

Regards.

A. Roy
TolomirAdministrator
Top Expert 2005

Commented:
I've requested that this question be closed as follows:

Accepted answer: 168 points for teylyn's comment http:/Q_27240194.html#36315386
Assisted answer: 166 points for Alan_White's comment http:/Q_27240194.html#36315371
Assisted answer: 166 points for softpro2k's comment http:/Q_27240194.html#36315393

for the following reason:

This question has been classified as abandoned and is closed as part of the Cleanup Program. See the recommendation for more details.
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Commented:
Well, if the workbook is password protected and you can't even OPEN it without supplying the password, I don't see how comment http:#36315393 would be any use, since it relies on the workbook being open. In order to manipulate sheet tabs, you'd have to be able to open the workbook in the first place. If it's protected from being opened by a password, then that's exactly what you CANNOT do.

I vote for a split between http:#36315386 and  http:#36315371

cheers, teylyn
Well, it's hard to disagree with you teylyn when you are suggesting that I get more points.

However...
a) I'm not that desparate for more points
and
b) Due the the ambigous nature of the original question, it is possible that "trta911" did know the password but just wanted to remove it, in which case softpro2k's post is relevant. Clearly that's not what I originally took the question to mean but who knows?
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Commented:
Fair enough,

but as I read the original question, it says:

>> a file that is protected by strong password (to open and change)

I may be wrong, but to me that implies that the file can NOT be opened without supplying the password in the first place, so any suggestions about clicking sheet tabs would be obsolete.

I'm not hung up on this, however. Whatever works for the asker is most important.

cheers, teylyn
1) I took the term 'change' as unprotecting value of a protected cell (Still a guess...)

2) Alan_White exactly pointed out what I actually surmise from the question.

Cheers.
TolomirAdministrator
Top Expert 2005

Commented:
---> Due the the ambigous nature of the original question, it is possible that "trta911" did know the password but just wanted to remove it, in which case softpro2k's post is relevant.

was the reason for me.

---

I see more value in hinting to remove a known password, than just pointing to the usual cracking tools.

Tolomir
TolomirAdministrator
Top Expert 2005

Commented:
about: strong password: when a user has to enter "qyW&REcs?pfAYn#s8kKUK~X5" every time he justs wants to read a file and it is stored on a computer in a restricted environment, I see no reason not to remove the original password.

Most Valuable Expert 2011
Awarded 2010

Commented:
The point here is:

1) is the Workbook protected by a password?

or

2) is a Sheet in the workbook protected by a password?

Depending on the answer, there are two different approaches.

Worksheet protection as in 2) can easily be cracked by readily available code that is shared all over the internet. In order to apply this code, though, you must be able to open the workbook in the first place.

Workbook protection as in 1) prevents you from even opening the workbook, and you will need a tool to remove or crack the password. These tools are available commercially.

To me, the asker is facing a problem with opening a password protected workbook, which means s/he won't even get to the stage of clicking a sheet tab.

In this case, commercially available password cracking/recovery software is the only option.

I may be wrong.

cheers, teylyn
Most Valuable Expert 2011
Awarded 2010

Commented:
Tolomir: re comment http:#36559524 : That's exactly what I describe in my first comment. If you know the password of the workbook and you don't like it, use the system tools to change it. But you have to KNOW it to do so in the first place.
TolomirAdministrator
Top Expert 2005

Commented:
Teylyn, but given that there were 3 answers in the same 2 minutes (!) (I just found out, to be honest) and we did now cover all aspects of removing passwords from entire document, single sheets (maybe some should stay protected ;-) or all sheets...

I guess we can close it according to my suggestion.
Most Valuable Expert 2011
Awarded 2010

Commented:
Maybe the asker could be bothered to clarify. To me the construct

>>file that is protected by strong password (to open and change).

where not "strong" but "open" is the operative term. This means that the file cannot be opened without a password,

But if the general consensus is that this question is also about sheet protection (which I do not see reflected anywhere in the original question), I may have interpreted the question wrongly and bow to the consensus.  It's not that big a deal, really. It's just that I'm addicted to detail ...

cheers, teylyn

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