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jimbecher
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"Business Class" internet connections

  I have always heard trunk lines (T1, T3, etc) are "more stable" and "more reliable". Comcast has a  20/5 "Residential" package for say $90/month. Than they offer a "Business Class" package with the same bandwidth for say $130/month. Then you have a Verizon T3 (3.0/3.0) for say $700/month

   As a business why would I even consider a T3 at $700/month when (if I could get it) a Comcast "Residential" package at 20/5 has a lot more bandwidth?

   What is "more stable" and "more reliable" when it comes to a T3? Different switches? Better routing? Why in the world would a business choose a T3 over much cheaper alternatives and what is the difference between "Residential" class and "Business" class?
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8/22/2022 - Mon
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Carl Dula

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Lee W, MVP

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jimbecher

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  You guys have all touched on what I am looking for. Different SLAs, different contention ratios, more or different resources but can you see how nebulous those terms are? It would take months and months or research and pouring over SLAs with a fine tooth comb to even begin to understand if you are getting "Business Class" service. How daunting. I mean what it boils down to is that the ISPs are saying "Trust me. You are getting Business Class". Ya right :)

   My guess would be that the real difference between "Comcast Residential" and "Comcast Business" is $50. End of differences but to truely determing that would take an avalanche of research, phone calls and infinite details on the SLAs.

   I will tell you what started this ball rolling. We are in somewhat of a rural area. About the only two games in town are Mediacom and Centurylink. We have Mediacom "Business Class"  15/2 with a static IP for $140/month. I called anothe business a mike a way to see what they were using and paying. This dude said he had a 10Mbps ethernet connection from CenturyLink and it was costing him $3,000/month!

   My jaw dropped! I know there are gives and takes and that you can never really compare apples to apples but I'm paying $140/month for 15/2 and he is paying $3,000/month for 10/10. How in the world can you justify that? I am kind of like you Lee. Yes 10 or 15 years ago 56k/T1/T3 trunk line were worth it but with competition and advances in technology they seem to have lost their luster. Hence my question.

   It still seems that trunk lines do have some advantages to them but at what cost? Where do you draw the line?
     

   
ee_reach

I do understand what you are saying - how can you be sure you are getting anything different/better than what they offer to residential.  

Having said that, one way to decide how much to spend has much to do with your company's particular usage requirements.  What is mission critical?  If you are just shipping stuff from your garage and you don't have industrial strength servers and/or a call center running out of your home, probably it is not worth it to you.  

On the other hand, if you are in a rural environment, your choices are limited, in which case advances in technology may not be the deciding factor.
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Larry Struckmeyer MVP

Also, even where the ISP does not block SMTP traffic on the residential class service, their agreement will often say "no email servers".
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William Peck
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This is just a suggestion, but if you haven't actually purchased and installed your server at home yet, I am wondering if you have considered renting a dedicated server that is hosted on an industrial strength network.   I had many of the same thoughts that you had when I first started my at-home service, and found that my home/residential ISP would not allow me to do many of the things I wanted to do with network traffic.  However, for roughly the same price as the cheaper business class service you mentioned, I could rent a sma//medium grade server that sits on a network with redundant pipes, redundant power sources, RAID, a remote backup server, etc.  And I am not committed to that particular server.  If my needs grow, I can move up to a larger server at any time.  Just a thought.