SQL Cluster had 2 CPUs Removed or Disabled due to licensing, can we put them back?

PaRamirez
PaRamirez used Ask the Experts™
on
We have a SQL cluster and to comply with licensing we either disabled in the BIOS or physcially removed CPUs. Im not sure which yet. In either case can it kill the cluster or create any issues, to take a SQL cluster and just either re-add CPUs when it is down or re-enabled a CPU in the BIOS?

To perform this process on a 2 node SQL cluster is there any special steps or things to make sure of or watch out for? Whats the best way to do this if possible?
Comment
Watch Question

Do more with

Expert Office
EXPERT OFFICE® is a registered trademark of EXPERTS EXCHANGE®

Commented:
Didn't you limit the number of processor sql uses in the sql configuration?

To find out how your SQL Server is currently configured, right-click on the server in Enterprise Manger or Management Studio, and select “Properties”. Next, select the “Processor Tab” from the “SQL Server Properties” dialog box.
 
Here, you should see an option under “Parallelism” called “Use all available processors”. By default, after installing SQL Server, this option is selected. When this option is selected, SQL Server will automatically take advantage of all the CPUs in your server. The other option user “Parallelism” is “Use x processor(s)”, where the x refers to the number of processors in your server.

Author

Commented:
I was told what counts is what the OS sees, and the merely disabling how may procs are used in SQL does not make you compliant? And really this is for re-enabling missing CPUs in the BIOS or putting back in place the physical CPU's that were most likely physically removed. I am farily sure there are 2 CPUs now physcially in place per node, we will be most likely adding 2 CPUs to each member of the cluster, hence adding 4 procs in total to a 2 node cluster. [adding 2 new procs to each node for total of 4 procs per each node or 8 total procs in the cluster, where as now there are 4 total Procs at 2 a piece]

So really I am asking what will happen if I re-Add physical procs back to the server, do I have to make any changes to anything? Changes in SQL, changes in the OS, changes in the BIOS, what and where???
Commented:
You don't have to change anything, except maybe re-enabling the cpu's in the bios. The OS en SQL Server will pickup the new processors.

I always thought you had to pay per processor sql is using but I was wrong

Processor License. A Processor License is required for each processor installed on each operating system environment running SQL Server or any of its components (for example, Analysis Services). It includes access for an unlimited number of users or devices to connect from either inside or outside the firewall. Customers do not need to purchase additional client access licenses (CALs) when licensed under the per processor model.

SQL Server will automatically pick up the new processor. All you need to do is purchase an additional processor license (assuming that's the model you are using) and add the new processor to each box.

David Gugick - SQL Server MVP
Acronis in Gartner 2019 MQ for datacenter backup

It is an honor to be featured in Gartner 2019 Magic Quadrant for Datacenter Backup and Recovery Solutions. Gartner’s MQ sets a high standard and earning a place on their grid is a great affirmation that Acronis is delivering on our mission to protect all data, apps, and systems.

Top Expert 2014
Commented:
Assuming they are multi-core CPUs then just putting them back wouldn't cause problems, if they were single core you might have to change to a multiprocessor HAL.

Author

Commented:
1. Do the CPUs that go back in have to match 1:1 what is already in place?

2. How do you change to a multiprocessor HAL???
Top Expert 2014

Commented:
Very few boards support two different speed CPUs, they're normally fussy enough to want them to be all/both the same stepping (bit like firmware level). You probably have MP HAL already, what CPUs or make/model server is it?

Do more with

Expert Office
Submit tech questions to Ask the Experts™ at any time to receive solutions, advice, and new ideas from leading industry professionals.

Start 7-Day Free Trial