The Linkd Utility

Hi,
I just used the Linkd tool to create junction points for a couple of large but little used directories on the system drive of a Windows Server 2003 that i moved to another drive to free up space. I have two questions about using this method to free up space on the system drive.

First, In explorer on the server the junction points seem to be indistinguishable from a directory that actually resides on the drive. Is there a way to tell a junction from an actual directory in Server 2003, or to list all junction points on the server?

Second, how much of an overhead penalty is there when using a junction point that point to another drive on the same server?

Thanks for your help!
westoneAsked:
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neisConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Hi westone,

You may take a look at the Link Shell Extension utility (http://schinagl.priv.at/nt/hardlinkshellext/hardlinkshellext.html) utility. It does what you want.

Also, I can recommend the Junction Link Magic utility at http://www.rekenwonder.com/linkmagic.htm to manage the junction points.

There is no "overhead penalty" as far as I know.
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GilesmpCommented:
You should be able to see the junction points by using "mountvol /L"

I don't know about the overhead I'm afraid; all I can tell you is both my users and I never noticed a drop in performance on our old file server which was set up in this way.

One thing you may also need to consider with junction points is your backup.  Make sure, if you use a product such as BackupExec, that you select the option for following junction points.
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westoneAuthor Commented:
Gilesmp: On my server, it appears "mountvol /L" requires the name of the source in order to show the target. I was looking for something to show all existing junctions whether or not I was already aware of them.

neis: Thanks, that does the trick.
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