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what power supply for this board

Biostar N68S3B GeForce Socket AM3 Motherboard .  I have tried 3 power supplies.  Two won't connect on the 24 pin power strip.  The 3rd one plugged in, but it won't power up. Maybe I have the wrong power supply? Board is new. I know nothing, can plug parts together and that's about all.
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rodynetwork
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rodynetwork
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2 Solutions
 
compuiterCommented:
Make sure you dont miss the 4 pin connector, probably 6,8 pin.
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compuiterCommented:
The switch on tje back tirned on or the jumper not on clear cmos mode.
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truinxCommented:
ATX Power Connectors:
        1 24-Pin Connector
        1 4-pin ATX 12V Power Connector
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rodynetworkAuthor Commented:
I went through 4 power supplies before I realized I had the power switch on the wrong pins on the mobo. Der.  Ok, now I have it powered up, but the 24 block socket, how do I say?  I used a power supply that has a 20 pin and so there are 4 blocks still open?  Seems to power up Ok. Is that hurting anything?  Harddrive spins, CD spins, fan is on....
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rodynetworkAuthor Commented:
this may be a stupid question, but, is it hurting anything to have the 20 pin plugged into the 24 pin block?  Computer is running and seems fine, so I am assuming this is Ok.  The board has a 24 pin block and the power supply I am using has on 20 pin male connector.
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Jim-RCommented:
24-pin power supplies and you

20-pin power supply, 24-pin motherboard

Works fine. The 20-pin supply can simply be plugged into the motherboard and will Just Work provided the motherboard doesn't attempt to draw a great deal of current. Any problems will manifest as system instability under load.

A number of companies sell adapters meant to resolve this situation; those adapters are a waste of money.

There is one partial caveat. Older supplies (from before the Pentium 4 era, especially) were typically built on the assumption that most power draw would be on the 3.3 V and 5 V rails, and relatively little would be on the 12 V rail. In modern systems, the processor and power video card lean heavily on the 12 V rail, and consequently newer systems need a stronger 12 V rail. Old power supply designs may have difficulty coping with this situation.

You may need to upgrade the PSU if you add a higher powered video card or other components depending on their power draw.
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