Access ODBC can't edit all the tables

Hi

I have an ODBC link to an SQL table in Access.
I am able to edit some of my tables, but can't edit all
of them, particularly the larger ones. What causes this.
Some of the tables that can't be edited don't have key fields.
Would this cause these sorts of problems?
Murray BrownMicrosoft Cloud Azure/Excel Solution DeveloperAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

MINDSUPERBCommented:
"Some of the tables that can't be edited don't have key fields.
Would this cause these sorts of problems? "

The key fields are very important in table relationship. If your forms are source from a query whose tables have no PKs, you will have troubles editing or editing data on those tables.

Sincerely,
Ed
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
SQL Server (and most other server-type database engines) require that you have a Primary Key defined on the table in order to be able to edit them. Note that when you link a SQL table, you can define a "unique index" on that table, which may allow you to actually update it. You can try adding an index to your linked table (Access will complain, but try it anyway) and see if that resolves it. If not, then you'd have to modify the SQL table to include a primary key.
0
Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)President / OwnerCommented:
<<If not, then you'd have to modify the SQL table to include a primary key. >>

 Or just add a timestamp field, which allows Access to to row versioning and be able to update the table.

Jim.
0
Determine the Perfect Price for Your IT Services

Do you wonder if your IT business is truly profitable or if you should raise your prices? Learn how to calculate your overhead burden with our free interactive tool and use it to determine the right price for your IT services. Download your free eBook now!

Murray BrownMicrosoft Cloud Azure/Excel Solution DeveloperAuthor Commented:
thanks very much
0
dportasCommented:
Just to correct something that was said above. SQL Server (as with any SQL DBMS) does not require a primary key to allow you to update a table. That's a limitation imposed by Access linked tables - unless you use SQL passthrough or stored procedures you can't normally update a table without an identifiable uniqueness constraint. It is of course a good idea to ensure that every table has a key anyway! :)
0
Murray BrownMicrosoft Cloud Azure/Excel Solution DeveloperAuthor Commented:
Thanks very much for the additional information.
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Microsoft Access

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.