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Question on using Make Table query in Access

I like to have one Make Table query in Access that will be use to create 3 local tables from linked tables

For example I have:
Linked table A,B and C
Now in my query  Make Table I want to create AA, BB and CC local tables if I run it. Also I want to suppress any warning that it will delete the existing local tables

Can someone give me an idea if it is possible?
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Gerhardpet
Asked:
Gerhardpet
1 Solution
 
babesiaCommented:
VBA Code is one way.

create a form with a button to run some vba code.

code :
check for local table.
If exists : Delete existing data from local table.

Run update query from Link table


Done.
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sofsolCommented:
I have a query that over-writes a table, and I run that query from inside a macro. Start with the macro action SetWarnings set to No, then run your query, then close wih the macro action SetWarnings again but now set to Yes. Note that in Access 2010 to see the SetWarnings action you need to click on "Show All Actions" at the top of the maro design window.

delme.png
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hnasrCommented:
A make table query creates only one table.
You need to run 3 make table queries.
Or run VBA code to run sql changing the select part to create the tables.
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Armen Stein - Microsoft Access MVP since 2006PresidentCommented:
MakeTable queries are notoriously unreliable, because they can take liberties with the structure of the new tables.

Instead, create your local tables just once, with the desired structure.  Then use two queries instead of the single MakeTable query.

1.  Delete all rows from the local table.  "Delete * from MyLocalTable"
2.  Insert the desired data into the local table using an Append query.

Warning messages can be suppressed using DoCmd.SetWarnings = False.  Turn it back on after your queries run.

Hope this helps,
Armen
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GerhardpetAuthor Commented:
Where is the DoCmd.SetWarnings = False setting in a query?

Sorry I'm a novice in Access
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Armen Stein - Microsoft Access MVP since 2006PresidentCommented:
It isn't in the query, it's a command you can run in VBA or a macro.  It's documented in Help.
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Jeffrey CoachmanMIS LiasonCommented:
Docmd.sertwarnings will only suppress the message about running the Make table query.
You can avoid the "existing table" alert by any number of techniques.
If it were me, I would simple tell the code to delete the table if it exists.

Create a form
Drop a button on the form
On the OnClick event of the button, use code like this:

'------------------------------------------
    If DCount("Name", "msysobjects", "name='AA'" & " and type=" & 1) = 1 Then
        DoCmd.DeleteObject acTable, "AA"
    End If
    CurrentDb.Execute "SELECT A.* INTO AA FROM A;", dbFailOnError
   
    If DCount("Name", "msysobjects", "name='BB'" & " and type=" & 1) = 1 Then
        DoCmd.DeleteObject acTable, "BB"
    End If
    CurrentDb.Execute "SELECT B.* INTO BB FROM B;", dbFailOnError
   
    If DCount("Name", "msysobjects", "name='CC'" & " and type=" & 1) = 1 Then
        DoCmd.DeleteObject acTable, "CC"
    End If
    CurrentDb.Execute "SELECT C.* INTO CC FROM C;", dbFailOnError
   
    'Optional, Visual Confirmation
    'MsgBox "Done"

    'Optional, refreh the Database Window/Navigation Pane
    'RefreshDatabaseWindow
'-----------------------------------


Sample attached for fun

;-)

JeffCoachman
Database28.mdb
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Armen Stein - Microsoft Access MVP since 2006PresidentCommented:
Hi Jeff, my point was not to delete or recreate the table object at all, just empty and refill the rows in a persistent table.  We're  discussing two different approaches here.
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Jeffrey CoachmanMIS LiasonCommented:
ArmenStein,

<We're  discussing two different approaches here.>
Ah, yes, ...

Sorry for the misunderstanding, ...

As I read my post, I should have made it clear that I was in no way saying that any other approach was invalid, or that my post was superior.

As always there is always more than one way of doing something, so it is best to know a few different approaches...
;-)

Jeff
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Luke ChungPresidentCommented:
I agree with Armen that MakeTable queries are dangerous to use. Far better to use a template table approach and use a DELETE query followed by the INSERT query.

I'm stunned I haven't written anything about this. Could have sworn I did in the past. Here's my paper on Microsoft Access Query Tips and Techniques (SQL and VBA) which should give you a solid overview of what you can do with Microsoft queries interactively and programmatically.

Our Microsoft Access Query Help Center offers even more query related resources.

Hope this helps.

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