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home network wireless router and another router

Posted on 2011-09-05
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I just moved into an apartment and am about to get verizon fios.  The apartment is wired so that there are network cables in most rooms which go down to the basement.  I would like to use the wired connection all over the apartment and also have a wireless router in the apartment (the basement is too car below to put the wireless down there).  Is there a way to split the connection in the basement so that I can use a wired connection in the apartment, then also use a wireless router in the apartment?

I am not sure if this would mean having two routers, or if there is another option.  Also, is there a way to use a simple network hub in the basement?
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Question by:jackjohnson44
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6 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 36486099
You should be able to add your own wireless router to the wired network in the apartment.

Select a wireless router, log into it on one of its wired ports, turn off DHCP, connect a wire from one of the LAN ports to your wired network, give the wireless router an IP address on the wired network. The only trick I can see is what address to use.

Did the apartment management tell you what IP addresses you had?  You may have to select one the you do have and use it.

... Thinkpads_User
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Author Comment

by:jackjohnson44
ID: 36486107
Thanks for the response.

It is a 2 family house and I am on the second floor.  There is no network now, there are wires going into my wall outlets that come out in the basement that are not connected to anything.  I plan to put a router down there and connect it to those wires.  In my apartment, I will connect a wall outlet to another router and use that for my wireless.  Both routers will belong only to me and nothing is hooked up yet.
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by:John Hurst
John Hurst earned 250 total points
ID: 36486120
OK, that helps. When you set up the wired router in the basement, check the DHCP range. It is likely (just likely) 192.168.1.100-150 or 192.168.1.100-199 .

So setting up per above, give the wireless router a LAN address of 192.168.1.11 or something like that.

Now your wired router in the basement is giving out DHCP (which it should) and your wireless router will piggy back of that.

My wireless router is in the basement and serves the house, but I connected it exactly as I noted above.

.... Thinkpads_User
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Author Comment

by:jackjohnson44
ID: 36486259
Thanks, but what about the router names, do they have to be the same?

So basically as long as I give the child router a static ip, I should be all set?
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LVL 94

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 36486288
No, the router names do not have to be the same.

Give the wireless router (child router?) an IP in the non-dynamic range of the basement router. It does not have to be defined as static (at least on my wireless router), but it will be static because the basement router will never change it.

... Thinkpads_User
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Accepted Solution

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Fred Marshall earned 250 total points
ID: 36486298
From the Verizon website, it appears that their routers are wireless and multi-port wired.  Very typical these days.

So, you can plug into the Verizon router:
- cables that go elsewhere
- cables to computers
- cables to other wireless routers

Cables that go "Elsewhere" might connect to:
- switches such as a Linksys EtherFast 10/100 5-port for $12 at Amazon.
- a wireless router (I'd use a wireless "N" router - which are quite prevalent) connected as a switch (see the attached paper) then no need to mess with addresses, DHCP ranges, etc.  All you need to do is turn off DHCP and maybe readdress the router so it's on your Verizon router LAN.

You can have as many switches and wireless routers as you like.  If more than one, I suggest you keep the wireless signals on different channels with different SSIDs.

Just think about having a switch at the end of a long cable.  Then, if you need a wireless router there anyway, substitute the idea of a switch with a wireless router as a switch AND wireless access point.  You can still wire computers to that wireless router as well as connect with the wireless.

Typical building wiring for telephone and data is all CAT5 cable.  So that will be good for ethernet connections.  Just make sure you use 2 TWISTED pairs in the cable.  Also, probably good to know that the cable doesn't go somewhere else.  But, if it works, then something must be right!!

EIA/TIA 568B is by far the most common.  So, I suggest you use the pins and color codes for the wires using that convention.  See http://duxcw.com/digest/Howto/network/cable/cable5.htm

In the case that you just can't cable but might get wireless signal, you might consider using WDS or a Repeater Bridge configuration of interconnnected wireless routers.  Just be sure to get the router(s) that will do the job.
Rather technical but information at:
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Repeating_Mode_Comparisons

If you're going to do something like that, strongly consider the antennas (and routers that will take external antenna connections).  The Hawking 15dbi indoor antenna can be useful for such linking.  And, I've used vertical 9dbi antennas very successfully as well (they look like a 2.5 ft broomstick).

Summary:
Interconnection dictated by what's possible.  Wired or wireless if you must.
Almost any combination of wired and wireless can work nicely with the computers as long as the wireless coverage is adequate to suit your needs.


Wireless-Router-as-a-Simple-Swit.pdf
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