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DNS question

I need to change my nameservers. All of the A records and MX records will stay the same. Will I still be subject to the 24-48 hour period of propogation as far as email is concerned?
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critona
Asked:
critona
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1 Solution
 
madhatter5501Commented:
I don't think so, the change should be immediate if the new mailserver is using the same public ip
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critonaAuthor Commented:
The mail is sent through Excel Micro / Postini filtering service so the 4 MX records will not change.

Example 10 xxxxxxxxxxx.com.s5a1.psmtp.com.
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critonaAuthor Commented:
Can someone give me a definitive answer? I dont want to kill our mail in the middle of the week if I can wait till Friday...
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PapertripCommented:
The whole 24-48 hours thing is just what people say to end users so that they don't freak out when the change isn't immediate, all that matters in that scenario is the TTL on the records involved.  That is besides the point anyways.  As long as the zone is still being served on the old nameservers, and the A/MX records aren't changing, you are safe.

BTW MX records are not related to where mail is sent from, but rather where mail for a domain is to be delivered.
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critonaAuthor Commented:
Yes... The MX record shown is an example of where our email is being routed to and then passed on to our server. Can you give me some more info on the TTL factor? Is that something I have any control over?  TX
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PapertripCommented:
I don't know if you have control over it, it would depend on how you manage your DNS.  TTL is time to live, and dictates how long a record is allowed to stay cached.

As I mentioned however, if your old nameserver is still serving your zone then you should have nothing to worry about in regards to this question.
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PapertripCommented:
However, knowing what your current NS record(s) TTL is will let you know when you can remove the zone from the old servers.

Use this to find out, put in your domain name and select NS query type and hit go.
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PapertripCommented:
@critona has your question been answered?
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PapertripCommented:
Hi critona, how are things going with this issue?
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PapertripCommented:
Hi critona,

If this solved your problem, could you close out this question please?

Thanks!
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