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New CPU Fan base touches sottered circuits on the bottom of mainboard

Posted on 2011-09-06
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Last Modified: 2012-05-12
Hi,

I just ordered a new motherboard.  I'm using the CPU and CPU Heatsink/Fan from the previous motherboard that I had.  When I install the base of the CPU fan over to the new mainboard (the part the CPU metal latch screws into) it touches metal on the back of the motherboard.  By metal, I mean some sottered circuits or something on the backside of the mainboard.  There's little metal sottered points protruding from the back of the mainboard where this cpu fan base needs to go to line up with the holes for the heatsink on the top side of the mainboard to screw into.  As a result, the CPU fan base does not lay flush with the mainboard.  This results in one or two of the screw connectors to come through the motherboard at a weird angle.

Does this matter?  My first impression is that it will create some kind of electrical current that can connect circuits to each other in a way that is not designed.  I do not want to put power to the computer to turn it on until I can get verification on whether or not it's safe to proceed.

Thanks!
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Question by:Gewgala
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by:Plantwiz
ID: 36492942
Could you provide a photo?  Or perhaps the mainboard and chassis you are using?

If you are using a better brand of board, Intel, ASUS, Gigabyte, etc... these should be in pretty good order to accept parts withotu issue.

However, you maybe have a board that slipped through inspection and is causing a problem, but without seeing it, it is difficult to say with certainty.

Confirm the series of CPU/heatsink you are using are rated for the new Mobo.  Are you using the MFG heatsink?  Or did you upgrade with that old CPU?  

Confirm you have the correct standoffs in place.  And also confirm any mounting brackets are used, as some Mobo's do use a special mounting bracket under the CPU to secure the H/S.

If force is needed, there is a good chance something is not lined up properly...and I'd agree, do not power up until you confirm.  CPUs should slip easily into the socket and the H/S should mount easily though the retaining clips may need a little force (but not too much).

Photos might help though if you are able...
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by:Gewgala
ID: 36492952
Thanks.  Photos coming in about 5 minutes.
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by:Plantwiz
ID: 36492957
Ok.  I'll check back in afew.

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by:asidu
ID: 36492958
If the screws are not touching the mother board and there is clearance there should not be an issue.
I would suggest that you use smaller screws or file the screws shorter to have a clearance.
Also you could try putting some washers so that the screw does not protrude out excessively.
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by:Gewgala
ID: 36493047
Hopefully these are descriptive enough as to what's going on.  Sorry it took longer than 5 minutes, I wanted to put more detail into them.

Sottered points are causing the CPU heat sink base plate to not lie flush

Heat sink base is not flush and has direct contact with sottered points
It's causing the screw connector to come through the board at an angle
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by:Gewgala
ID: 36493055
The CPU Heat Sink is one I'm carrying over from an HP system that I ordered a couple years ago.  It's not the base plate that came with the new motherboard, it's just the only CPU heat sink that I own.  I'm ok with ordering a new one if I need to.  What I can also try to do is cut away the metal on the plate that is interferring with those pins with a saws all or something.
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by:Gewgala
ID: 36493057
Oh, and the motherboard is an ASRock.
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asidu earned 400 total points
ID: 36493079
You could cut off the heat sink plate or drill holes. That would solve the problem of the plate lying correctly on to the motherboard. Having done that the screws that are at angle will then fix in correctly.

Also must check if the plate touches at any other soldered point on the motherboard. A short could
mean disaster.

I would consider putting a layer of mica insulator between the motherboard and the heat sink to avoid a direct contact to the mother board.
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by:Plantwiz
ID: 36493092
Something looks amiss here...
First, I don't use that screw head for the Mainboard install, I like the hexscrews and that's mostly experience and preverence, but never a problem with them.

Second, and I need to look up the Mobo, but why is the screw head on the same side as the solder points?  The screw heads should be on the face of the Mobo only, not the bottom.

Let me look up that board to see if I can find a better look at it.

Chassis
Standoffs (according to your board and chassis)
Screws into each standoff.

Almost never are washers needed these days, but washers could be used...I don't believe that is your problem.  I think...and will know when I look more closely that you have unnecesseary screws or misplaced screws on this install...
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by:Plantwiz
ID: 36493095
The CPU Heat Sink is one I'm carrying over from an HP system that I ordered a couple years ago

as I look back over your post, it is POSSIBLE that your HP H/S was propriatery and will work with your new install.  You may need to purchase a NEW H/S and possibly a new H/S and CPU...but very likely a new H/S.

I'll see if I can locate some info, do you have model numbers on these items?  Origianl box model or mobo numbers?
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by:Plantwiz
ID: 36493097

This photo:

DSCN1096-edited-2.jpg

Is one where the screws appear to be facing the wrong direction...so either the install will not work with this mobo, or something was installed improperly.
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by:Gewgala
ID: 36493101
So yeah, a short is something to worry about, which is what I was afraid of.  I'll probably try cutting it to fit.  I thought about that but wasn't sure if this was a common practice, sounds like it is!  (I'm a software guy not equally versed in the hardware field).

With mica insulator... I don't think I own anything like that.  There's this kind of grey, metallicy looking plastic that's rolled up like a taquito that came with the motherboard.  That's probably not it, right?
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by:Plantwiz
ID: 36493112
I would hold on the 'cut to fit' just yet...

Yes, cutting can be done and is done to modify chassis, however....Frequently there are safety items installed to protect the equipment, so before you CUT, if you want some help, please provide models of items you are cutting and attempting to fit.

If you mess up the chassis, you'll be buying a new one regardless, but there may be a reason for where parts are located on the current box you have...

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by:Plantwiz
ID: 36493122
mica insulator would be similar to this:  
http://www.reliancemica.com/

Or you can obtain it in sheets and cut to size...

Again, I caution about merly modding a box, without knowing what you have 100%
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by:Gewgala
ID: 36493188
Sorry I missed a lot of your posts and was away at dinner.

Mainboard is ASRock X58 Extreme 3
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157189

I'm using an Intel i-7 950 cpu, I don't need to get a new one of those.  The fan/heat sink on it is a Foxconn, numbers on it are 9A8A1 1366BPYR.  

I bought the CPU and CPU Fan/Heatsink from HP 2 years ago in a pre-made system from them.  The plate that I'm showing you in the picture is no different then the way the CPU metal latch installs into a smaller one.  It's just a slightly different shape because the CPU heat sink that I have uses those connectors that come through the motherboard on the top side and screws down into them.
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by:Gewgala
ID: 36493195
@Plantwiz regarding DSCN1096-edited-2.jpg and how there is a screw that looks to be facing the wrong direction - the motherboard came that way.  I was wondering about that myself, but it's the screw used to anchor the heat sink on the north bridge.
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by:_
ID: 36493245
Unless the HP was an i7 also, you will need a different base plate at least.
The mounting holes for the socket 775, 1156, and 1366 are slightly different:

Intel's Nehalem processors require a new generation of socket 1366 heatsinks that may or may not be compatible with socket 775, and the recently talked about socket 1156 Lynnfield CPUs. The problem is motherboard heatsink retention hole spacing around the processor.
Socket 775 heatsinks use a 72mm x 72mm hole spacing. Socket 1156 heatsinks are set to 75mm x 75mm. Intel socket 1366 heatsinks on the otherhand use a 80mm x 80mm hole spacing. Most manufacturers are releasing brackets with their Intel heatsinks that will bridge the different spaces... but not all.


http://forum.pcstats.com/showthread.php?69128-Intel-Socket-1366-Socket-1156-and-Socket-775-Heatsink-Compatibility-Issues

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by:_
ID: 36493301
never mind... I missed the part where you said the cpu was from the HP.
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by:Plantwiz
ID: 36493446
@Gewgala:

I see the Mobo model now thanks!

What I don't see, is why that screw is there on your photo, however, I do not think that matters much if it was factory installed.   Your H/S Bracket appears to be much different from the one installed on the ASRock board.

Forgive my redundant question...is the HS I see in your photo the one from your old HP?  

Did you install this over the backet that appears in the photo on the ASRock board in the link you provided?

I have a call I need to take, but will look for the other specs you provided to confirm.  I suspect you need a different base plate and if the fan you have won't mount, a different fan too.  I'll have a little down time in a few minutes while I launch this diagnostic...back in a bit.
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Assisted Solution

by:Plantwiz
Plantwiz earned 100 total points
ID: 36493497
Looking at the ASRock site:
http://www.asrock.com/MB/overview.asp?Model=X58 Extreme3

the X58 Extreme3 comes standard with a CCO (or the combo cooler option).  So, as indicated above you should be able to use either a LGA775 CPU Fan or the LGA 1366 CPU Fan.

Back to my question, is the back plate you are using the default from ASRock?  Or is it one from HP?  The default one should accept either CPU Fan unless the one installed previously was proprietary and therefore not a standard spec to be transfered.

Otherwise, is it possible the base plate needs to rotate 90degrees to fit better?
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Author Closing Comment

by:Gewgala
ID: 36497185
I'm accepting @asidu's response as the accepted solution because he was the first to recommend cutting the base plate to fit and to look for any other contact points with metal on metal.  This is what I ended up doing - I used a dremel to cut the base plate to fit in all the necessary locations.  I am currently writing this on my new comp, so it works great.

I'm accepting Plantwiz's response as an assist because he did the additional research for me confirming that I can go ahead and use the same heat sink/fan from my previous build on the new mainboard.

Thanks again everyone, I am very grateful for your assistance.
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