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Switches

Posted on 2011-09-07
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Last Modified: 2012-07-01
When installing switches with gigabit ports, for example, let's say I have 4 x 24 port switches, do i just link them up via each gigabit port i.e switch A gigabit port to switch B gigabit port, B to C, C to D, D to router ?
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Question by:discoveranother
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8 Comments
 
LVL 69

Expert Comment

by:Qlemo
ID: 36497817
It is much better if you do not cascade. There is a limit of intermediate devices allowed between two endpoints, so you should e.g. use one switch as the connecting one for the router, and plug all other switches in there. Even better is if you can build a stack, using a particular uplink cable (proprietary to the device brand), because then all switches act as a single one.
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Accepted Solution

by:
MikeKane earned 84 total points
ID: 36497831
Depends on how you want to layout the network.    

Are these cisco switches or do yours support Spanning-tree?  

If yes, you can set these up like this:

Router
|          Switch
|        /          \
Switch1           Switch
         \           /
           Switch

Then you can let spanning tree handle the shutdown of the ports as needed to avoid a switching loop.   This way, if any switch, except for switch 1, dies you wouldn't lose connectivity from the others.  

If each switch will be isolated to hold its own subnet, then this might be better since traffic can be mostly isolated per device....  

Switch-----
                 \
Switch------  Switch1 -- Router  
                 /
Switch-----


Hope thats a good starting point for you....
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Author Comment

by:discoveranother
ID: 36497858
So for example, switch A to the router, and switches B,C,D in to switch A ?
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LVL 4

Assisted Solution

by:klodefactor
klodefactor earned 166 total points
ID: 36497874
Depends on whether they're unmanaged or managed.  If managed, whether they're stackable, whether you need switch redundancy, etc.

Assumptions:
- these are gigabit switches, not older 10/100 switches with only one or two GigE ports
- the router doesn't have a GigE interface, only 10/100 interfaces.
If unmanaged, I'd designate one switch (e.g. switch A) as the "top" and connect the other three independently into switch A.  Connect the router into switch A.

If managed, I'd stack them, then connect the router anywhere in the stack.

If you provide more detail about switch vendor and model number, and your resiliency requirements, I can provide more detail.

--klodefactor
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LVL 69

Expert Comment

by:Qlemo
ID: 36497879
Yep.
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LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:klodefactor
ID: 36497891
Clearly I have to start typing faster :-).
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LVL 1

Author Comment

by:discoveranother
ID: 36497961
Yeah they are managed switches. HP Procurve.
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LVL 4

Assisted Solution

by:klodefactor
klodefactor earned 166 total points
ID: 36498313
If you don't have extreme requirements for resilience, and the stacking cable's bandwidth is enough for your needs, I'd just stack them.

--klodefactor
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