2 router setup to allow port forwarding for access to remote desktop?

OK, this is a bit of a weird one.  Our small office users (about 5 people) have for years accessed their desktop remotely using Remote Desktop with a little hack I put in to allow multiple users to access their own desktop.  Basically, I use the fact that ports 3390, 3391, etc. are not being used otherwise, so I put in the router (simple Linksys) port forwarding so 3390 goes to, for instance, 192.168.1.12 and I hack the registry on this computer to set the RDP-Tcp to 3390.  (also, I make the computer address of 192.168.1.12 static, not from DHCP).  So this works great, and everyone seems to greatly prefer this over logmein.  They are just fixed in their ways and I can't change them.
Now, we are relocating to another site where we are sharing offices with a bigger organization and they are providing the internet to us.  So, they already have a router and server.  They don't want us touching their router or server.  Wondering if I could still use the router we have, shut off DHCP, make sure all our IPs are set up within the address range of their router/server and still have our router do the port forwarding to our computers as it always has.  I can't figure out if this will work, but I can't see why not.  Anyone know if it definitely will or won't?  
mignonnedavisAsked:
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AriMcCommented:
The bigger organization most probably has configured their firewall to block all or most incoming traffic so that would be the first problem. I would first ask if the bigger organization could provide you with a single address in their DMZ-zone and allow all incoming traffic there. Then you could configure your router to that single address and leave your small internal network as it is.
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jackiechen858Commented:
No. it won't work that way.

I think you have two options:

1. don't use your own router, ask them to setup same configuration on their router to do port forwarding for you.

2. keep your router, ask them to provide you a static ip address in their network ( say their network has subnet 192.168.100/24 , you need to get a static ip like 192.168.100.10); ask them to setup their router to do a port forwarding 3390~34xx ( depend on how many ports you need) to your router 192.168.100.10 first, then you can do the same trick on your router. All your machines need to connected to your router and has a different subnet like 192.168.1.xx, your router will have a wan static ip 192.168.100.10 and a LAN static ip 192.168.1.1.


Either way, you need to ask them to configure their router, no way you can do it by yourself.



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jerrodtracyCommented:
Unless you get them to open up a port that you can use your logmein it wont work.
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