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Access function or formula

Posted on 2011-09-11
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Last Modified: 2012-05-12
I get a text file from a linked SQL table that contains 201101021515  which is YYYYMMDDHHMM or "01/02/2011 03:15 PM"  Is there a formula / function to
convert 201101021515 to "01/02/2011 03:15 PM"

My goal is to export to Excel from Access, so i would like Excel to see the "01/02/2011 03:15 PM" as a date/time value that I can perform time calculations with.
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Question by:dastaub
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Patrick Matthews earned 500 total points
ID: 36519587
If that value is held as text:

CDate(Left(MyColumn, 4) & "-" & Mid(MyColumn, 5, 2) & "-" & Mid(MyColumn, 7, 2) & " " & Mid(MyColumn, 9, 2) & ":" & Right(MyColumn, 2))
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by:Gustav Brock
ID: 36519699
You could also use Format:


CDate(Format([YourFieldName], "@@@@/@@/@@ @@:@@"))

/gustav
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LVL 75
ID: 36519733
:-)
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LVL 92

Expert Comment

by:Patrick Matthews
ID: 36519777
gustav,

Very elegant!

Patrick
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LVL 49

Expert Comment

by:Gustav Brock
ID: 36521033
Yes, I like it too, though not invented by me.
A good reminder of the power of Format.

/gustav
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