RPM Install File Conflicts

I've been testing RPM installation with a sample package that originally had just 3 files.  I've been testing permissions and preinstall, and repacked a number of times, and successfully installed after most of them.

Now I've created a package that is much larger with many more files in package.spec.  When I tried to install it, I get error messages that there's a file conflict between the 3 original files and every version of the package that I've installed on the machine.  

What does this mean?
jkavxAsked:
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Ryan WeaverConnect With a Mentor Infrastructure ManagerCommented:
Yes, the -U option will upgrade a previously installed package. The -i will try to install the package even if there is already a package of that name installed.

For example, new kernels are installed with -i so that a previously known good kernel is always available to boot from.
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jkavxAuthor Commented:
file /home/userId/standalone/listener.jar from install of testFinal-1-2.7.noarch conflicts with file from package testFinal-1-2.6.noarch
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Duncan RoeConnect With a Mentor Software DeveloperCommented:
It might work if you remove the old package first (with rpm).
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Ryan WeaverInfrastructure ManagerCommented:
Are you installing or upgrading the package?

Installing: rpm -ivh, will leave the oiginal package in place and maybe causing the conflict.
Upgrading: rpm -Uvh, will replace the old installed rpm with the new one you specify.

If you are getting the conflict message even when upgrading, there may be something else going on, but you can add --replace-files to the command line to have rpm replace the files that are conflicting.
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Duncan RoeSoftware DeveloperCommented:
As I understood it, you were developing the package. Is that correct?
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jkavxAuthor Commented:
I'm just testing the development of the package at this point.  Once this is ready, an SA will do the release.  I'm never worked with RPM before so I'm trying to understand how this works.  I'm doing an install myself in my home directory just to confirm that the package has been created correctly.

So generally speaking, there would be an initial install, and then subsequent upgrades to the package would change the version number, and be installed with the -U option?
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