Automatic home folder & permissions creation when setting up a new user on Server 2008R2 AD

Is there a way to make 2008R2 AD setup a user folder along with the relevant permissions on a file server shared drive whenever I create a new user? Currently, I have to create the folder and permissions manually for each user and then run a logon script to map a drive letter to that shared user folder when the user logs on to the domain.
mark-199Asked:
Who is Participating?
 
mark-199Author Commented:
Thanks snusgubben; I already looked at that article but it's for Server 2000/2003.
0
 
mark-199Author Commented:
I also saw this but I'd rather not use scripts or GP:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Software/Server_Software/File_Servers/Active_Directory/Q_26655050.html
I will try the first answer given for that question.
0
Has Powershell sent you back into the Stone Age?

If managing Active Directory using Windows Powershell® is making you feel like you stepped back in time, you are not alone.  For nearly 20 years, AD admins around the world have used one tool for day-to-day AD management: Hyena. Discover why.

 
snusgubbenCommented:
The article is also valid for 2008 R2.
0
 
arnoldConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Is this for roaming user profile/redirected folders? or for a different purpose?
Roaming/folder redirection I would agree with snusgubben's comments.

Roaming users, does not require folder redirection which is controlled by GPO.
The benefit of this separation deals with speeding up the login process.
i.e. if the user has a roaming profile without folder redirection, all their data has to be copied from the server to the workstation for the login session to begin. initially it is not an issue, but as the user creates more and more documents, the longer it will take for those documents to be retrieved delaying the user's login.

0
 
mark-199Author Commented:
snugubben, the article is for Server 2003; the main principals may work for Server 2008 but as there are quite a few differences between the two, I'd rather follow a tried and tested 2008 article.

Let me be a bit more precice as to what I am trying to achieve here.
We don't use folder redirection of My Documents or roaming profiles; we simply want a network home folder fo each user.
We have a simple logon script that maps several shared drives to the users' PCs when they logon to the domain. In AD > User account > Profile > Home folder, I select a drive letter for the Home drive and specify the path to our file server. I would then like AD to automatically  create a folder on the file server share along with all the relevant permissions. As it stands, I have to manually do this on the File server. Also, when I logon to the domain on the client's PC, the home drive doesn't appear.

I remember that we had it setup on Server 2003 so that AD would do all the work for us...
0
 
snusgubbenCommented:
I see what you want to achieve. The NTFS and share permissions are the same in both 2003 and 2008, so the article does apply to 2008. The same goes with AD Users & Computers profile tab. If you want to follow another article it's up to you. I have followed it in a 2008 R2 environment with success :)
0
 
arnoldConnect With a Mentor Commented:
The home directory in the way you described it does create the directory when you hit apply.
When you are specifying the home dir, do you have \\server\sharename\%username% or are you only putting in \\server\sharename?
Using the line \\server\sharename\%username% in the home dir folder, will create the directory using the user's username.

Can you attach an image of what you've setup.
0
 
mark-199Author Commented:
Thanks to both of you, the problem was that I used AD administrative centre to setup the user. It could be a bug or an issue with our AD setup. It worked as expected when I did it in AD Users & Computers.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.