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Windows 7 - Disk partition

Posted on 2011-09-12
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Last Modified: 2012-05-12
Hi,

I have a brand new hard drive (919 GB) with windows 7 installed on it.

What I want to do is make a partition - so that the OS and program files equate to 150 GB and the rest of the space  is a new partition.

When I go to "shrink" the volume it is saying that I only have 456163 MB available and wont let me increase the value?

I tried to defrag my hard drive but still get the same problem ... any ideas?

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Question by:Eternal_Student
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by:madhatter5501
ID: 36524827
try using gparted, you can download for free and it works good

http://download.cnet.com/GParted-LiveCD/3000-2094_4-10698802.html
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PowerEdgeTech earned 250 total points
ID: 36525600
Windows 7 can only shrink an OS volume so much, depending on many things, so if it can't shrink it, you will need to either reinstall (recommend starting with only a 20GB partition, then extending later) on a smaller partition, or take your chances with third-party software to shrink it.
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by:nobus
ID: 36527677
try the free partition manager from Paragon :  http://www.paragon-software.com/free/
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by:Eternal_Student
ID: 36548182
@ PowerEdgeTech ... you say "take your chances with 3rd party software" ... what is the risk?
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by:PowerEdgeTech
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Minimal, I'll admit, but there is still a chance that things will go wrong.  Don't do it without a backup first.
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by:Eternal_Student
ID: 36579414
I really cannot understand why Windows 7 cannot shrink it down fully?
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by:nobus
ID: 36579657
that's how MS made it -you'll have to ask tehm i fear
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by:PowerEdgeTech
ID: 36910701
I've heard many theories, but I believe it has more to do with the seemingly random placement of "unmoveable" files during the Windows installation (or maybe there's a rhyme and reason for it).  If you install to a full 80GB partition, after installation, C: can only be shrunk by about 50%, whereas if you install to a 20GB partition, then extend to 80GB, you can shrink back the full amount (and more).  I think this is also the source of the "chance" you take with third-party utilities.  There may be a reason Windows doesn't try to move unmoveable files, where the utilities don't care - they just move them.
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