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Can U mix 2003 and 2010 Access Front-ends

Posted on 2011-09-13
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Last Modified: 2012-05-12
Hi there,

I set up a splt database in Access 2003 and the company has sinced migrated to 2010. Currently there are some front-end users who've not been migrated to 2010 yet so they are still running on 2003. I have not converted the database tables to 2010 format as I want to retain the old security set-up.

The problem is that two of my users cannot seem to get into the system anymore. They log in and are presented with a blank grey screen. The menu form refuses to appear. It just so happens that both have not yet been migrated to 2010. Could this be a significant factor?

They were at one point able to use the system even though we had 2010 users around but it seems that this is no longer the case. I am completely stumped...

Regards,

John  
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Question by:JohnSaint
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13 Comments
 
LVL 85
ID: 36528796
Does each user have their own seperate copy of the database FE? Or are the users sharing the same copy of the FE (e.g. you've placed the FE on a network share, and all users launch it via that network share)?

If each user has their own copy, then we'll need some more information.

If your users are sharing the same copy, then you'll have to change this so that each user has their own copy of the FE. Users running Access 2003 or earlier cannot share the same database as users running 2007/2010. In fact, this should be your design paradigm regardless of whether your users are running the same versions of not. Running sepearte copies of the FE tends to be more stable (i.e. less corruption), you have fewer issues with recordlocking, and performance typically is much better, especially as you add users to the mix.
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Author Comment

by:JohnSaint
ID: 36528931
Hi there LSM,

Yes, everyone has their own copy of the FE and they all point to the same BE.

Cheers,

John
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LVL 85
ID: 36529021
Hmmm ... then I'd first see if you can recreate this using 2003, and see where your code is failing. I'd also try to redeploy a fresh copy to those 2003 users to see if there is something amiss with their local copy.

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Author Comment

by:JohnSaint
ID: 36529470
Okay. I don't think there is a coding issue as it works on most others but I could give them a fresh copy I suppose...
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LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:pteranodon72
ID: 36529813
John,

"Blank gray screen" comes up as a symptom of a read-only database. Check that the users with A2003 can read, write, create, and delete files in the directory of the back end.

pT72
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Author Comment

by:JohnSaint
ID: 36541932
Hi Pt72,

Hmmm, interesting. I'm not getting any messages of any kind. Does that sound like the correct symptoms?
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LVL 85
ID: 36542114
If your users could access the system prior to the changes, then their permissions should be okay. It never hurts to check permissions, of course.

I assume you're using Access User Level Security?

A blank grey screen generally indicates your startup form hasn't loaded (assuming you're using a startup form, of course). You might try temporarily choosing a different form as the startup form to see if that one shows.

Have you made changes in the database since users were migrated to 2010? If you have, did you use 2003 or 2010 to make those changes? If you used 2010, you could have some reference issue. The fix for that is to do your development work (or at least your final compile) in Access 2003.

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Author Comment

by:JohnSaint
ID: 36542132
LSM,

Also Interesting. I did make a small fix after I had been migrated to 2010 which may have coincided with my problems. This may all be academic as the two users have now been migrated but I think you may be on the right track. Absolutely no messages appeared which seems odd though...

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LVL 85

Accepted Solution

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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE ) earned 500 total points
ID: 36542223
" Absolutely no messages appeared which seems odd though..."

That's seems to be the norm with this sort of issue, however. No errors, Access will usually start, and the database may or may not behave normally. If it doesn't the user begins to experience various oddities. There's no rhyme or reason to those oddities, nor is there any consistency, so it's very difficult to troubleshoot.



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LVL 85
ID: 36542228
"That's seems to be the norm with this sort of issue, however."

This is somewhat misleading. I didn't mean that this is the norm with ALL reference issues, just with this specific reference issue. In most cases, if you have missing or invalid references, Access will just refuse to start.
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Author Comment

by:JohnSaint
ID: 36542380
Wow. Thanks for your help. I think you may have cracked it although all users have now been migrated! You still desrve full marks for this.

Can I be cheaky and ask a quick question. I haven't been actively compiling my vba.

Should I do this?, Will it make it quicker?

Cheers...
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Author Comment

by:JohnSaint
ID: 36587565
Anyway, Cheers
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LVL 85
ID: 36587877
< I haven't been actively compiling my vba. >

You should compile your application regularly. It helps to iron out troublesome code before it becomes too firmly entrenched in your app, and can sometimes speed up your app.



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