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asp.net referencing a class

Hi,

I am building an desktop app in C#, So I have a form called FORM1.cs and in the same solution I have a class file called RequiredColumns.cs.

I want to be able to reference/call the class from the RequiredColumns.cs file in FORM1.cs

The code in the  RequiredColumns.cs

Shown below

Please help

Thanks,

R8VI
Public class PropertyInfo 
{
    public PropertyInfo()
    { 
    }

    int iPropertyID;
    string sAddress; 


    public PropertyInfo (int iPropertyID, string sAddress)
    {
      this.iPropertyID = iPropertyID; 
      this.sAddress = sAddress;
     }


}

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R8VI
Asked:
R8VI
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1 Solution
 
RainverseCommented:
PropertyInfo objPropInfo = new PropertyInfo();
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käµfm³d 👽Commented:
I want to be able to reference/call the class from the RequiredColumns.cs file in FORM1.cs
While this is entirely possible, I'd just like to confirm that you indeed want to make use of the code found in Form1.cs. You are aware that you won't be able to actually display the form via ASP.NET to an end-user, right?
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R8VIAuthor Commented:
HI Rainverse

I did what you are suggesting and it says the type or namespace name PropertyInfo could not be found are you missing a using directive or an assembley reference

Hi Kaufmed yes I am aware of that

Please help

Thanks,

r8VI
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RainverseCommented:
Well then I guess you need a using PropertyInfo; statement at the top, though I'm not quite sure why.

-MJC
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R8VIAuthor Commented:
I am confused what do you mean at the top
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käµfm³d 👽Commented:
@Rainverse
Well then I guess you need a using PropertyInfo; statement at the top,
You don't using a class--at least now how it's implied in that statement. You using a namespace!

@R8VI
Is there a namespace declaration surrounding the PropertyInfo class? If so, what is the name of said namespace?
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R8VIAuthor Commented:
Hi kaufmed,

There isnt a namespace surrounding the class at the moment

Thanks,

r8VI

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käµfm³d 👽Commented:
It's generally a good idea to have a namespace. In the interim, while you decide whether or not to have one, try declaring your variable like this:

global::PropertyInfo objPropInfo = new global::PropertyInfo();

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R8VIAuthor Commented:
Hi would it be easier or better if I put a namespace ,
And if I did then how would I still reference the class ?

Thanks,

R8vi
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käµfm³d 👽Commented:
Hi would it be easier or better if I put a namespace ,
Easy/hard doesn't really come into play. "Better"? I suppose many would say yes. I would agree.

Using a namespace is a way to structure your code into a logical layout. It also helps avoid naming conflicts when two developers (or even one developer) use the same name for two different class definitions. Take for example the following two classes:

public class Record
{
    public int Speed { get; set; }
    public string BandName { get; set; }
    public int SongCount { get; set; }
}

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public class Record
{
    public int BatchId { get; set; }
    public string ClientName { get; set; }
}

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Now you might infer from the names of the properties what each class is supposed to represent. Overlooking that, what if I needed to use both of these classes in the same code:

public class RecordCompany
{
    public Record CurrentAlbum { get; set; }
    public Record Producer { get; set; }
}

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In lines 3 and 4 above, how does the compiler know which Record to apply to each line? A simple way to accommodate this scenario is to use namespaces:

namespace Audio
{
    public class Record
    {
        public int Speed { get; set; }
        public string BandName { get; set; }
        public int SongCount { get; set; }
    }
}

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namespace Accounting
{
    public class Record
    {
        public int BatchId { get; set; }
        public string ClientName { get; set; }
    }
}

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Now, the earlier code can be adjusted as such:

public class RecordCompany
{
    public Audio.Record CurrentAlbum { get; set; }
    public Accounting.Record Producer { get; set; }
}

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Now you should be able to see to which Record you were referring in each line.
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