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Not enough free space on SBS 2008

We have a SBS 2008 server which is has an incorrectly formatted 46 GB C drive.

We are at a stage where we have moved all SQL / Exchange / Sharepoint / WSUS databases / transaction logs to the D drive along with everything else which can be moved away from C.

Right now, on C are only the program files for SBS's integrated applications and the Windows installation. There is a WINSXS folder in the windows directory which takes 22GB. We are aware that we cannot touch that so need some advice on how to make room for Windows to run properly. Right now, we have crippled exchange to make it work in <1% free space environment and are expecting some sort of corruption any day now.

Does anyone either know a good way of reducing the size of the winsxs folder or safely expanding the size of the C drive?

 
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durge
Asked:
durge
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1 Solution
 
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
What else is using your disk space?  WINSXS may be using 22 GB, but that leaves you 24 GB - what's using that?
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durgeAuthor Commented:
SpaceMonger screenshot

http://i.imgur.com/Mm9DI.png
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Neil RussellTechnical Development LeadCommented:
If have additional drives I would also suguest that you move your WSUS files to the other drive.
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durgeAuthor Commented:
@Feebleminder: Thanks, however we only noted a 1.4GB reduction in size after running compcln.exe.

Please also correct me on the size of the winsxs folder. It is 11GB as of right now, if you look at the spacemonger screenshot in my previous reply, you can see what is taking up space.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Wow... that's a horrible program.  So difficult to read what is what... can I suggest you try WinDirStat instead?
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FeebleminderCommented:
A good way to expand the volume size is to use a cloning software, clone the drive, and then make the volume larger. That would be your best bet.

Is your C:\ volume on the same disk as another volume? If you have room on the boot drive then you could extend the volume using disk management.
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durgeAuthor Commented:
@Leew: Thanks, will try that. I used SpaceMonger because I think it will easily give you a rough idea of what is where with a single screenshot.

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durgeAuthor Commented:
@Feebleminder: Immediately to the right of the C partition is the D partition and then to the right of D is 3GB unallocated so unless I move D somewhere else, I won't be able to expand C. This is a solution, however I am not sure how the sytem will behave if I disable D temporarily. It might cause  the whole thing to crash as there are system files on it.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
I don't care what is where... I want to know how much space is used by what folders - having to look all over the place for a "rough idea" is awful.  WinDirStat gives you a list summary (sortable by size, allows you to drill down, and also gives you a graphic representation).
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Neil RussellTechnical Development LeadCommented:
The easiest solution long term is to add a drive(s) and then create a new volume on it as follows.

Add drives
create raid array on new drives
in windows create a new volume and assign a windows drive letter, lets use G:
over a weekend or other suitable time, MOVE all your data from drive D: to drive G:
TEST DATA
delete D: partition
Now extend your C: partition to whatever size you want.

Job done.
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Neil RussellTechnical Development LeadCommented:
Oh and dont forget to rename the G: drive to D: :D
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durgeAuthor Commented:
@Neilsr: Thanks for that. How dangerous is an "extend" operation on the system drive though?
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Neil RussellTechnical Development LeadCommented:
Its as dangerous as anything else.
BACKUP first

Personnaly I have never had one fail and done lots.
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FeebleminderCommented:
I would suggest adding in more HDD as well as soon as possible. Running that low on disk space can be problematic.
To try and get a little more room an disk you can clear some of the logs out.
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durgeAuthor Commented:
Thanks everyone
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