Go Premium for a chance to win a PS4. Enter to Win

x
?
Solved

Linux to SQL Server, authentication

Posted on 2011-09-14
8
Medium Priority
?
361 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-12
http://www.easysoft.com/products/data_access/odbc-sql-server-driver/whats-new.html

>>>SQL Server 2008 Security The SQL Server ODBC driver’s Windows authentication support means that using the driver to integrate Linux/Unix with SQL Server 2008 will not compromise security best practices defined and enforced by SQL Server 2008’s Policy-Based Management. Because the SQL Server ODBC driver lets you access SQL Server from Linux/Unix by using this best practice login mode, SQL Server authentication support is not a prerequisite for our driver. Your SQL Server instance does not therefore have to vulnerable to attacks associated with this legacy authentication mode.

Does this mean that we can authenticate Linux to SQL, windows authentication?  If not, is anyone aware of a workaround, that will allow me to do so?

0
Comment
Question by:dbaSQL
  • 4
  • 4
8 Comments
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:Steve Bink
ID: 36540502
Windows authentication in MSSQL uses the underlying OS authentication.  Linux does not have that, AFAIK.  You might be able to pass credentials in your connection for SQL Server to check against its parent Windows catalog, though.
0
 
LVL 17

Author Comment

by:dbaSQL
ID: 36542227
>>You might be able to pass credentials in your connection for SQL Server to check against its parent Windows catalog, though.
Can you elaborate, routinet?  Maybe give me an example, or point me to another reference?
0
 
LVL 51

Accepted Solution

by:
Steve Bink earned 2000 total points
ID: 36545128
I'm saying pass your credentials as a Windows credential, i.e., domain\user.  I'm not saying it will work...just that it might.  :)

With Windows authentication, SQL Server does not actually handle the authentication part.  It passes it off to the Windows sub-system and relies on its response.  Depending on your environment, that sub-system could be the local catalog of users, or maybe an Active Directory controller on your domain.  Your problem is not authenticating with SQL Server, but authenticating with the OS it is running on.

SQL Server has an SQL authentication mode for a reason - not every computer in the world uses Windows.  Microsoft's recommended practices are great in a homogenous environment, but do not really translate well once you introduce other OS platforms.
0
Technology Partners: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 
LVL 17

Author Comment

by:dbaSQL
ID: 36545143
aaaah.... i see what you're saying.  pretty much what I had feared.... no magic linux to sql pill out there yet.
that sucks


thank you routinet.
0
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:Steve Bink
ID: 36545162
I've seen some material saying you can duplicate this by using Kerberos (which makes sense, I suppose), but that is well outside my skill set.  Good luck!
0
 
LVL 17

Author Comment

by:dbaSQL
ID: 36545275
definitely need all the luck i can get on this one.... i am tasked to redesign the entire data model, to include, of course, the application layer security.  98% of which is non-windows, and currently coming in without any restriction at all.  :-(

I'll get there.  
thanks again, routinet
0
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:Steve Bink
ID: 36545380
Keep in mind that SQL mode is not necessarily a bad thing.  It just means that proper care needs to be taken when managing the credentials.  With Windows authentication, that is all handled at the OS level, which means network administrators familiar with policy get to deal with it.  A DBA may or may not be in a position to know or implement those policies.  With SQL mode, they must be.  It does not have to be less secure than using Windows authentication.
0
 
LVL 17

Author Comment

by:dbaSQL
ID: 36545468
Understood.  I am very fond of the windows mode, for the auditability, and control.  i commonly go the sql mode for the application layer... i was just wondering if there were any changes out there, that maybe i hadn't heard of yet.
0

Featured Post

[Webinar] Cloud and Mobile-First Strategy

Maybe you’ve fully adopted the cloud since the beginning. Or maybe you started with on-prem resources but are pursuing a “cloud and mobile first” strategy. Getting to that end state has its challenges. Discover how to build out a 100% cloud and mobile IT strategy in this webinar.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

One of the most important things in an application is the query performance. This article intends to give you good tips to improve the performance of your queries.
This month, Experts Exchange sat down with resident SQL expert, Jim Horn, for an in-depth look into the makings of a successful career in SQL.
Via a live example, show how to set up a backup for SQL Server using a Maintenance Plan and how to schedule the job into SQL Server Agent.
Using examples as well as descriptions, and references to Books Online, show the documentation available for datatypes, explain the available data types and show how data can be passed into and out of variables.

782 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question