Can I force user shares to close or logoff

Last night I thought I had logged everyone off their workstations – used my master key to access all but 2 offices. I determined everybody was logged off. Still I got a message that I did not have exclusive access to the Access database which usually means that someone is still logged on the database.

I am using SBS 2008. All workstations are either Vista or Win 7.

How can I have all computers log off after a certain period of inactivity? Or after a certain time of day? Or can I force all user shares to close?
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LostInWindowsAsked:
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Connect With a Mentor Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
Here's a Microsoft article which shows how to detect idle time, and how to logoff users if they exceed your idle timeout period:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb243861%28v=office.12%29.aspx

Note, however, that even after logging everyone off, you can still end up with a "hanging" ldb file. If you do, then you'll have to delete the .ldb file (Access will create it as needed).
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LostInWindowsAuthor Commented:
Is the .ldb file created on the workstation or on the server? If on the server, is it in the Database directory?
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Rob WilliamsConnect With a Mentor Commented:
One solution that was introduced with WinNT that is still used today is the Winexit screen saver:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314999

You can also use the Microsoft psshutdown tool to force a text list of computers ,or all using wild card, to close applications and logoff, reboot, or shut down. This could be run as a command, or scheduled event from the domain controller.
http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Microsoft_Operating_Systems/Server/SBS_Small_Business_Server/Q_27309029.html
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LostInWindowsAuthor Commented:
Hmmm, sounds interesting. let me ask...
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
<Is the .ldb file created on the workstation or on the server? If on the server, is it in the Database directory? >

Assuming you're working with a split database architecture (a Backend consisting of Tables ONLY, and multiple FrontEnds consisting of everything else):

The .ldb file for the Backend will be in the same directory as the Backend, and it'll have the same name. For example, a file named MyBackend.mdb will produce a Lockfile name MyBackend.ldb.

The .ldb file for the Frontend will be on the user machine in the folder that holds the FE database (assuming you've deployed a COPY of the FE to each user). If you haven't deployed an FE to each users, then you'll need to search the target machines for .ldb files and attempt to delete them.
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LostInWindowsAuthor Commented:
Hi LSM,
There is 1 database located on the server with everything in it. The database has a lot of links to picture files also located on the server.  
All users except for 3 'programmers' are using Access Runtime 2007.
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
<There is 1 database located on the server with everything in it. >

Then the .ldb file should be on the folder where that database is located. You might also consider rebooting the machine hosting the database, as this will remove all Windows locks on that file.

Further: The database should be split to a Backend and Frontend scenario, and you should deploy a copy of the FE to each user. While you may have been fortunate enough to have no issues so far, you'll eventually run into them - corruption, performance issues, record locking, etc etc.
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LostInWindowsAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the great suggestions
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