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win 7 sysprep and unsigned drivers

Hello experts

Ive been trying to tweak my driver inf files for install as part of my sysprep imaged deployment but have obviously changed the inf files deeming them unsigned (All im doing is turning off non required tray icons added to registry or setting default registry values like enabling pme for nics etc) which im assuming is why now after sysprep and deployment the machine isnt auto installing my drivers as before. Im curious what other people do in this situation, is it possible to turn off the driver signing requirements or to some how sign and trust the files again ? Any help is greatly appreicated
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Jarrod
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Jarrod
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xemaCommented:
Porka;
I'm assuming you are preparing an image to be deployed to similar machines.
In the past I've created sysprep images, just do a complete install of the OS and the drivers then run the sysprep aplication and save the image.
With that image you can install the OS with the drivers with out the problem of unsigned drivers. Or at least it was my experience BEFORE Win 7.
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JarrodAuthor Commented:
The image is for about 7 machine types all up and covers about 700 machines so wanted to make sure I get it right. The master machine is actually a vm so I never install any drivers in it as such and use the pnputil method to add support for them which was working well until I tried to modify the inf files where now with pnputil im asked if I wanted to install an unsigned driver and even though I agree after deployment in a test environment the machines no longer auto install the driver for the inf files ive modified so I would assume driver signing issues stop the auto install
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xemaCommented:
A cumbersome task, but I did it with a smaller group, four types of machines.
Set up one machine of each model and do a sysprep, you'll end up with several different installation disks one for each type.
That way you won't have issues with the installation.
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xemaCommented:
I forgot;
You'll need the drivers for each chipset type, video, audio, etc. at the end you'll end up with a big installation with lots of unused drivers, some thing I wouldn't recomend. So preparing an installation disk for each type of machine will givw you a more cleaner installation
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JarrodAuthor Commented:
I was trying to avoid keeping multiple images and future proofing to a point where possible but as a last resort Im probably going to use a reg file in the setupcomplete.cmd after the deployment to clean up instead, just would have liked to streamline the driver install a bit better
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xemaCommented:
Porka;
You can prepare a single disk, but you'll have to use it on all of the types of machine you have.
Prepare an sysprep image with type I equipment, deploy it on type II, load the drivers prepare an sysprep image, and so on until you have cover all of the posible combinations.  That way you'll have a single image for all of your types of machines.
That's the only way I think you could prepare a single installation disk tha won't have issues with different types of equipement.
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