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ushort bitmask "cannot implicitly convert type 'int' to 'ushort'

Posted on 2011-09-15
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Last Modified: 2012-06-27
I can do this:
      ushort x = 0xFFFF;
      ushort y = x;
      y &= 0x01FF;

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but I can't do this:
      ushort y = x & 0x01FF;

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I get the error: Cannot implicitly convert type 'int' to 'ushort'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?)

I try throwing in casts but Visual Studio still complains:
      ushort y = (ushort)x & (ushort)0x01FF;

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What is the proper syntax for this?
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Question by:deleyd
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2 Comments
 
LVL 19

Accepted Solution

by:
Raheman M. Abdul earned 125 total points
ID: 36542477
Try
 ushort y = (ushort) (x & 0x01FF);
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LVL 3

Assisted Solution

by:russellC
russellC earned 125 total points
ID: 36542504
Try:
ushort z = (ushort)(x & y);   // OK: explicit conversion
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