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Ubuntu: To turn off the password authentication

Posted on 2011-09-15
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Last Modified: 2012-05-12
Hi,

1) I have setup the Ubuntu workstation (version 10.04.3) in the production environment

2) When installing the Ubuntu, I specify the followings:
- User is "jwhite"
- password is "Boba"

3) I gave the computer to Jwhite
- jwhite was annoyed .....many times he has to "key in" the password

4) I believe that we can select something like "prompting the password" or "no prompting the password" during the installation
- Now, it is late (the installation has been completed)
- But, i believe we still be able to select "No prompting the password"

5) My question: Would somebody show me how to select "Not prompting the password at all" per GUI and per Command line?

6) Thanks

tjie

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Question by:tjie
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Frosty555 earned 2000 total points
ID: 36543720
The feature you are looking for is built into the "sudo" functionality of Ubuntu. JWhite is not a root user, so whenever he wants to do anything that requires administrator access he must first authenticate himself and then request root privileges. This process is done by a utility called "sudo".

When you are at the command line, you put "sudo" infront of the command you need to run with root permissions, e.g.
    sudo apt-get update

When you are in a GUI (the desktop environment), Ubuntu will prompt the user graphically for this information using a utility called "gksudo" - this is the white administrator password prompt you are seeing that is annoying jwhite.

"Sudo" is dangerous, that's why jwhite has to authenticate himself whenever he requests sudo permissions.

You can make jwhite a password-less sudoer - make it so he does not need to enter his password to use sudo. If you do this, the password prompts will go away on Ubuntu. This is not recommended - it opens the computer up to attack because administrator privileges can be granted to any program that requests it without confirming it with jwhite.

Realistically, JSmith should just "suck it up" and type his password when prompted.

If you really want to disable sudo password prompting, you need to edit the "/etc/sudoers" file and configure it to allow sudo without password prompting. You do this by using the "visudo" command line utility from a terminal.

Here's some documentation on how to do this:

http://www.ubuntugeek.com/how-to-disable-password-prompts-in-ubuntu.html

You cannot do this from a GUI, because this is NOT a good idea to do and Ubuntu does not want to provide such dangerous and unrecommended functionality to the end user. It goes against the security guidelines and design of the linux operating system. If a user REALLY wants to do this, they should at least have enough technical saavy to be able to use a terminal.

Here's a somewhat heated debate as to why this will never become a GUI option:

http://brainstorm.ubuntu.com/idea/14714/
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