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"How many cores does your processor have? Are you assigning processor/core affinity to threads?"

Posted on 2011-09-16
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Hello
Please answer this question:
"How many cores does your processor have? Are you assigning processor/core affinity to threads?"
hp-ux

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Question by:mohet01
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by:mohet01
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any command or system file that i can check to know this answer?
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HappyCactus earned 167 total points
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what about:

/usr/sbin/ioscan -kf | grep processor | wc -l

( https://www-304.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=swg21105416 )
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by:amolg
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by:gheist
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Second question:

Probably not since it gets asked.
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by:eager
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"cat /proc/cpuinfo" will tell you everything about the processors on your system.

No, I don't assign cpu affinity to programs or threads.  You need stable work loads to use cpu affinity effectively.  It might be used to assign a VM to a particular thread.  

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by:gheist
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stable workload = oracle, db2, tomcat, websphere (but not apache or X11)
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by:eager
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Er, I meant "assign a VM to a particular CPU".  

If you are running a particular application like the ones mentioned by @gheist which has high processor utilization and requires very high responsiveness, then assigning it to a particular CPU may make some sense.  Otherwise, Linux does a good job of allocating CPUs to threads, likely better than manual assignment.

Think of assigning CPU affinity to a process in the same vein as manually assigning memory to a process.  You can do both, and in some cases each may be a good idea, but operating systems are almost always much better at managing resources than users.
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by:mohet01
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thank u
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