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Clock in dialog

Posted on 2011-09-16
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Last Modified: 2012-05-12
I want this to be updated in a dialog. How do I do that?
package Thread;

import java.awt.*;
import java.util.*;

public class Clock implements Runnable
{
    Font f = new Font("TimesRoman",Font.BOLD,24);
    Date d; Thread runner;
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Clock c = new Clock();
        c.start();
    }

    public void start(){
        while(runner==null){runner=new Thread(this);runner.start();}}

    public void run()
    {
       while (true)
       {
           d = new Date();
           System.out.println(d.toString());
           try {Thread.sleep(1000);}
           catch(InterruptedException e){};
       }
    }
}

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Question by:Mickeys
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15 Comments
 
LVL 47

Expert Comment

by:for_yan
ID: 36550061
Please, elaborate what it is that you want to achieve.
0
 

Author Comment

by:Mickeys
ID: 36558614
Right now I just have the code as a Clock-class. But I can't it to show in my GUI. How do I do that?
0
 
LVL 47

Expert Comment

by:for_yan
ID: 36558638
What kind of GUI do you want to have?


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LVL 47

Expert Comment

by:for_yan
ID: 36558680
Is this something you want to have:

import javax.swing.*;

import java.awt.*;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;

public class Clock {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        JFrame f = new JFrame();
        JLabel l = new JLabel("Time:      ");
        SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("MM-dd-yyyy HH:mm:ss");
        java.util.Date d;
        Container c = f.getContentPane();
        f.add(l);

        f.setSize(200,100);
        f.setVisible(true);
        f.setLocation(300,300);
                    int count =0;
                 try{
              while(count < 60) {
        Thread.currentThread().sleep(1000);
               d = new java.util.Date();
                  l.setText("Time: " + sdf.format(d));
                  count++;
              }

                 }catch(Exception ex){
                     ex.printStackTrace();
                 }
                    System.exit(0);
    }


}

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Author Comment

by:Mickeys
ID: 36581702
I did like this, men I run the code is hangs.
private void button_KlockaActionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt) {                                              
        Clock clock = new Clock();
        clock.startClock(); //Anropa klockan.
    }            




new class clock

 public void startClock() {
        JFrame f = new JFrame();
        JLabel l = new JLabel("Time:      ");
        SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("MM-dd-yyyy HH:mm:ss");
        java.util.Date d;
        Container c = f.getContentPane();
        f.add(l);

        f.setSize(200, 100);
        f.setVisible(true);
        f.setLocation(300, 300);
        int count = 0;
        try {
            while (count < 60) {
                Thread.currentThread().sleep(1000);
                d = new java.util.Date();
                l.setText("Time: " + sdf.format(d));
                count++;
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex) {
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

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LVL 47

Expert Comment

by:for_yan
ID: 36581716
Why would not you ruin the code I sent you ?
0
 
LVL 47

Expert Comment

by:for_yan
ID: 36581738
Or post the whole full code of the whole class you are running so that I could try to compile and run it.
0
 

Author Comment

by:Mickeys
ID: 36582205
You have the full code, I just replaced the main-metod in my first question with your code.

But here is the code anyway:
import java.awt.*;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.*;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;

public class Clock implements Runnable
{
    Font f = new Font("TimesRoman",Font.BOLD,24);
    Date d;
    Thread runner;
    
    public void startClock() {
        JFrame f = new JFrame();
        JLabel l = new JLabel("Time:      ");
        SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("MM-dd-yyyy HH:mm:ss");
        java.util.Date d;
        Container c = f.getContentPane();
        f.add(l);

        f.setSize(200, 100);
        f.setVisible(true);
        f.setLocation(300, 300);
        int count = 0;
        try {
            while (count < 60) {
                Thread.currentThread().sleep(1000);
                d = new java.util.Date();
                l.setText("Time: " + sdf.format(d));
                count++;
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex) {
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public void start(){
        while(runner == null){
            runner = new Thread(this);
            runner.start();}
    }

    public void run()
    {
       while (true)
       {
           d = new Date();
           System.out.println(d.toString());
           try {Thread.sleep(1000);}
           catch(InterruptedException e){};
       }
    }
}

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LVL 47

Expert Comment

by:for_yan
ID: 36582215
Why do you need these threads and runnable?
0
 

Author Comment

by:Mickeys
ID: 36582224
Don't forget the button:
private void button_KlockaActionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt) {                                              
        Clock clock = new Clock();
        clock.startClock(); //Anropa klockan.
    }

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0
 
LVL 47

Expert Comment

by:for_yan
ID: 36582242
So you don't want it to start immediately - you want to have the button to start it?
0
 
LVL 47

Expert Comment

by:for_yan
ID: 36582249
You don't need threads
0
 
LVL 47

Expert Comment

by:for_yan
ID: 36582839
No, you are right - if you really need the button to start - then you need to deal with threads.
I'll try to make the working code later
0
 
LVL 47

Accepted Solution

by:
for_yan earned 2000 total points
ID: 36585039
This has buttons - starts, stops.
Check it out.

import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;

public class MyNewClock extends JFrame implements ActionListener {
    JLabel label;
    JButton button;
     JButton button2;
       JButton button3;
     PrimeTask pt;

    public MyNewClock(){
        super("My new clock");
        label = new JLabel();
        label.setText("Time: 09-22-2011 12:00:00");
        button = new JButton("start");
        button.addActionListener(this);
          button2 = new JButton("stop");
        button2.addActionListener(this);
                  button3 = new JButton("close");
        button3.addActionListener(this);
        Container c = this.getContentPane();
        c.setLayout(new FlowLayout());
        c.add(button);
        c.add(button2);
          c.add(button3);
        c.add(label);
        this.setSize(300,100);
        this.setLocation(300,300);
        this.setVisible(true);


    }



  public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae){
          if(ae.getSource().equals(button)){
        pt = new PrimeTask(label);
      pt.execute();
      }
               if(ae.getSource().equals(button2)){

      pt.stop();
      }
                     if(ae.getSource().equals(button3)){

      System.exit(0);
      }

  }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new MyNewClock();
    }

}
class PrimeTask extends SwingWorker{
         JLabel lbl;
          SimpleDateFormat sdf;
    boolean toRun = true;

    PrimeTask(JLabel lbl){
        this.lbl = lbl;
           sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("MM-dd-yyyy HH:mm:ss");
        
    }

    
    public String doInBackground(){
        String s = null;
              toRun = true;
              //int count =0;
                 try{

              while( toRun) {
        Thread.currentThread().sleep(1000);
              java.util.Date  d = new java.util.Date();
                  lbl.setText("Time: " + sdf.format(d));
                //  count++;
              }

                 }catch(Exception ex){
                     ex.printStackTrace();
                 } 


        return s;
    }

    public void stop(){
        toRun = false;

    }

}

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LVL 47

Expert Comment

by:for_yan
ID: 36585048
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