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Restore to different size drive, question about how it works

Posted on 2011-09-16
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My RAID 5 is 500 GB that is partitioned as C 235GB and E 230GB where C uses 205 of the 235 partition and E uses 36 of the 230 partition.  Data takes up 241 and some of that can be moved to a spinnings disk.  When I use Acronis to do the bare metal restore, will that work if I use a 245GB SSD?   Trying to make it work with the smaller, less expensive SSD, but may need to spend more and get a 512GB?  I can't seem to find a Corsair 500GB
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Question by:rodynetwork
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by:marcustech
marcustech earned 250 total points
ID: 36549351
Depending which particular Acronis package you're using restore to a different sized drive shouldn't be a problem, as per http://kb.acronis.com/content/2770
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by:dlethe
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You seem to have the impression that a single SSD will never fail or lose a block of data.  Unless you have a pair of mirrored SSDs, then you are better off with the RAID5.
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by:marcustech
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As discussed in the related question Acronis will be backing up the ssd every 15 minutes, but this really isn't a valid alternative to RAID, it turns a drive failure into a disaster recovery situation whereas in RAID it's a simple drive swap out job.
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by:rodynetwork
ID: 36549458
Can we discuss the lost block of data idea?  If I have an incremental backup and at some point realize something is wrong and it comes down to lost data, help me understand what is faulty in thinking the bare metal restore won't solve that problem. I am thinking the lost data will be on the backup, not referring to new "just created" data loss, but stored data lost due to bad blocks. Won't that stored data be on the backup and be restored in the bare metal restore?  

I would like to explore that.  I realize this may be a pointless discussion, as it may be best practice to put at least two SSD's in service in RAID 1 or 0?  Is there any reason to use some other RAID where several smaller drives equate to one larger storage space? If so, is there any redundancy in that?  I know. lots of questions. I can break these out into "related questions", if that is better.  One problem I see with SSD's expensive is gonig over 500GB gets into stupidly expensive realm for me, so wonder about some RAID configuration that could use 4 or 5 smaller SSD's to create a larger total volume. For example, 5 100GB SSDs to create the size I need?  Any benefit like redunancy in that?
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Callandor earned 167 total points
ID: 36549459
I have used Acronis to make an image and restore to a smaller drive, as long as it was big enough to hold all the data.  You can do this automatically with the proportional restore, or specify manually what size to restore to.
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by:rodynetwork
ID: 36549491
Regarding the restore to a smaller drive issue, will my SBS 2008 and app and all their linking to the files and the database still be in tact? This is the thing I am trying to accomplish, to not have to go back and spend an eternity linking up all the zillions of links.  When we crashed last year it took a guy, the guy that wrote the system, about a week to get it all linked up again.  My hope in this is to have a fairly failsafe backup plan that when I bare metal restore, it all just works.  Thanks for all the input. Hope I am not driving you guys bananas. Love the input.  EE is amazing place.

Once I get comfortable with this, I plan to implement, probably next week, buy SSD(s) and test it out on a second server to see how it goes.
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by:Callandor
Callandor earned 167 total points
ID: 36549503
If the drive was in a normal state when the backup was done, the backup will have all the data.  If the SSD fails, you will know that it has failed, as you will start getting errors on your applications.  This is no different than with regular hard drives.  You would not use any backup made after that point in time, and it is unlikely a backup will work if there is a persistent error.

SSDs still won't work with TRIM in a RAID array, as far as I know, so using multiple SSDs that way has a disadvantage.
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by:marcustech
marcustech earned 250 total points
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You could get 4 smaller SSDs and configure in RAID10 to get a single drive totalling half the purchased storage space with redundancy ie. 4 200GB drives would give you 400GB of fully-redundant data space - prices of most of the drives don't seems to scale disproportionately to size in GB, so not sure if you'd save money compared to 2 400GB drives in RAID1 though.
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