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Upgrading from Office 2003 to 2010

Posted on 2011-09-16
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We are currently using Office 2003 on approximately 125 desktops running XP. These desktops are distriuted amongst five locations. We don't have any experience doing a mass install or upgrade via an automated process. I'm wondering if it would be best to upgrade from 2003 to 2010 or remove 2003, then install 2010? What tool would be recommended to accomplish this? We are running Exchange 2007, so we should be able to take advantage of the of the enhancements, correct? Thoughts, ideas? Any gotchas to keep in mind?......Thanks
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Question by:jslaymon
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by:knightlycomputing
ID: 36550561
While I've only done this a few times (and never with that many computers), the article that helped me the most was http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc179093.aspx.

Basically, I created a customized network installation folder by 1) copying the contents of the CD/DVD to a network share.  2)Created a Setup customization file (.msp file) by using the Office Customization Tool (OCT).  3) Copy that new .msp to the network shared with the installation files.  4) created a script that executes the setup.exe (or MSI) file.  

The setup will then use that .msp file to customize your installation.  You can then use that script as a logon script or instead of the script use the MSI in that folder to do the mass install via group policy.

You are correct in that Exchange 2007 offer many of the new features of Outlook 2010, however, I'm not up on what those features all are.

The only gotcha that I ran into (on XP) was trying to run the install script on too many computers at the same time.  The file server (and thus the install) slowed to a crawl.

I hope this helps a bit or at least gets you started.
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knightlycomputing earned 500 total points
ID: 36550562
While I've only done this a few times (and never with that many computers), the article that helped me the most was http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc179093.aspx.

Basically, I created a customized network installation folder by 1) copying the contents of the CD/DVD to a network share.  2)Created a Setup customization file (.msp file) by using the Office Customization Tool (OCT).  3) Copy that new .msp to the network shared with the installation files.  4) created a script that executes the setup.exe (or MSI) file.  

The setup will then use that .msp file to customize your installation.  You can then use that script as a logon script or instead of the script use the MSI in that folder to do the mass install via group policy.

You are correct in that Exchange 2007 offer many of the new features of Outlook 2010, however, I'm not up on what those features all are.

The only gotcha that I ran into (on XP) was trying to run the install script on too many computers at the same time.  The file server (and thus the install) slowed to a crawl.

I hope this helps a bit or at least gets you started.
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by:jslaymon
ID: 36550729
My plan is to do the install at one location at a time. We don't have the staff to handle the anticipated questions and phone calls that would come from all the users at one time.......thanks
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