Celebrate National IT Professionals Day with 3 months of free Premium Membership. Use Code ITDAY17

x
?
Solved

access on network link to access on web server

Posted on 2011-09-16
5
Medium Priority
?
286 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-12
This is way out of the realm of what I normally do and I tried searching but could not find any answers.  I have 2 access databases that I have inherited.  One is the tables.  The other is a bunch of forms, queries and reports and the later was linked to the former on a network share.  If one has to be moved to a windows 2008 web server and the other is left on a network share would the one on the network share be able to link to the one on the web server.  Is this possible yes or no.  If so how so?  Thanks.
0
Comment
Question by:thamilto0410
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 2
  • 2
5 Comments
 
LVL 75
ID: 36552778
Is there something special about the 'web server' ?
Can you 'see' it on the network?  If you can see it, then you should be able to link to it ...

mx
0
 
LVL 85
ID: 36553682
To clarify a bit on what mx posted: You must be able to browse to the new Backend location (the database where you Tables are located) by using a standard Windows Explorer window. If you can do that, then you can link to the database at that location.

However, even if you can do this, you almost certainly should not do this. Working with Access-based data over a WAN - and especially when the endpoint of that WAN is a web server - generally leads to corruption and data loss, and performance is almost always far less than acceptable.

If your goal is to make your data available to different groups of users in different places, then you have several options:

-- Move the data to SQL Server, or some other server-based database that allows remote users. Many web hosts provide MSSQL or MySQL databases which can be used remotely. You then change your table links to the tables on the server, fix any issues you'll find (and there will be some), and you should be ready to do. There will still be some latency, perhaps, but in most cases performance if good.

-- Use remoting technology, like Terminal Services. This allows you to host the database locally, and have remote users log into a Remote Desktop to work with your app

-- Move the app to a full web-based application. This would entail a ground-up rewrite, of course.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:thamilto0410
ID: 36553851
LMSConsulting --  Thank you for your response.    I am using what you have outlined above so far to outline to my client that maybe we are going down the wrong path.  Let me explain a little further and hopefully you can further educate me on possibiliites.  This was at one time for the end-user a working reservation application (stored on a network share) complete with an admin module allowing maintenance to some of the tables by 2 admins.

It stopped working.  Two options were discussed rebuild the entire system as you stated above from the ground up or for now just build the reservations piece for the intranet web leaving the admin piece alone.  I thought the complete rebuild the best option.  Sor the sake of time and rapid delivery though It was decided to go with reservation piece only.  This will be .net with one of the access dbs being the backend on a 2008 web server.  The other access db that handles the admin functions will be left on a network share as several admin users will need access to it and I am fairly certain they will not be given access to the web server.  Now if the database on the network share needed to link to the database on the web server to query and maybe even obtain updates would that be possible?  Or no?    
0
 
LVL 85

Accepted Solution

by:
Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE ) earned 1000 total points
ID: 36553944
The same concepts apply: The network share must be able to "see" the web server, as Databasemx pointed out earlier.

In other words, if you were to go to the physical machine that hosts that network share, you would have to be able to log onto that machine and navigate to the web server machine using ONLY Windows Explorer commands (i.e. no FTP, no browser, etc etc - just Windows Explorer). If you cannot do that, then that location cannot "see" the web server location, and your two databases could not work together.

The reason for this: Access is a file-server type of database, and doesn't support remote connections. It's little more than a structured text file with indexing and such, and doesn't provide features like the bigger server databases do.

You could perhaps provide a VPN connection to the web-server, and use that to allow the two to connect. This can cause as many problems as it resolves, however (i.e. what happens if the VPN crashes, how will the share machine log in, etc etc) and generally causes very poor performance in your application (although not so much if you're moving to a .NET frontend).

All in all, if you must store the data in a remote location, then your best chance for success is to move away from Access to a more robust database platform. SQL Server Express is free, and is quite easy to work with, and the upgrade path from Access to SQL Server is easy and quick.


0
 
LVL 1

Author Closing Comment

by:thamilto0410
ID: 36554574
Thank you so much.  I needed some assistance in arguing why this project should move away from Access and into a web format with a more robust database and you helped me to get my thoughts in an outline.
0

Featured Post

Industry Leaders: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

After seeing many questions for JRNL_WRAP_ERROR for replication failure, I thought it would be useful to write this article.
If you need a simple but flexible process for maintaining an audit trail of who created, edited, or deleted data from a table, or multiple tables, and you can do all of your work from within a form, this simple Audit Log will work for you.
In Microsoft Access, learn the trick to repeating sub-report headings at the top of each page. The problem with sub-reports and headings: Add a dummy group to the sub report using the expression =1: Set the “Repeat Section” property of the dummy…
With Microsoft Access, learn how to specify relationships between tables and set various options on the relationship. Add the tables: Create the relationship: Decide if you’re going to set referential integrity: Decide if you want cascade upda…

730 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question