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How to best setup an ASP.NET 4.0 project/solution for use by multiple developers

Hello experts,
What's the best way to setup a development environment for more than one ASP.NET developer. We don't have source control, which is itself an issue, but that issue aside, how should I set this up?

Initially I setup a 'web site' with all the asp.net code in there, which pointed directly to the test web server, and when I was the only one developing it worked fine.

Now I think I need to setup a 'web project' because we will have 2-3 developers and I've noticed that when using a 'web site' the .sln and .suo files got saved on my local machine.

We also have a lot of old ASP classic files. Can those be interspersed within the asp.net code using the same folders? Occasionally we have ASP files redirect to ASP.NET files and vice versa.

Thanks for your advice.
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dpicco
Asked:
dpicco
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nishant joshiTechnology Development ConsultantCommented:
remote desktop connection
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NauticalNonsenseCommented:
I'm using a "web site" with Tortoise SVN. If you're not opposed, there are companies out there that do SVN hosting (Unfuddle.com is the one I use).

Are you working locally or trying to code directly against the server?

I would highly recommend that you get a quick and cheap SVN / Source Control in place, develop locally, and check in and deploy when your code is solid. Always get latest and the source control will allow you to merge files if you're working in the same area. I use TFS at work work, and that's good too but hella overkill for my needs.

The time invested now in getting source control in place will save you 10, 100-fold in the long run. It's not complicated, you can do it yourself if you want, for free, and will save a ton of headache. Seriously. I spend most of my time working by myself on three to four different computers, and SVN has saved me countless times, and I'm just one guy and I usually know what I'm working on!
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dpiccoAuthor Commented:
NauticalNonsense,

Thanks for your comments. I'll work on the source control next.
We're working directly against a test server right now. I know it's not the best setup.
You're right. I need source control just when I work alone. Definitely need it when more than one developer is involved.

Thanks again.
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NauticalNonsenseCommented:
Yeah, working direct to server is definitely easy, but prone to error.

I use Web Sites mostly (have been meaning to convert to web application projects, but time is so limited, I'd rather write code), and use the Web Deployment Projects for ASP.NET. I build locally, and push that up to the development server. I don't really have to worry about project files and includes with Web Sites because it loads all of that on start, whereas I believe the Web Application Project you'll get into conflicts with other people when you add a file, they add a file, and the project / solution file is out of whack. So be careful there.

Right now I'm on a team of 30 devs building a large wpf app, and we occasionally have project file clashes when people add files. It gets sticky, and we're TFS!

Check to see if the "Web Site" will work just fine with several people in at the same time adding files. If I'm not mistaken, you're actually better off with Web Site because it builds on the fly. The Web Project you have to compile, and if you have 3 people adding new stuff, your SLN may get freaky.

That's my understanding anyway, but a little googling should answer quickly :)
I haven't done much direct dev against a box, it's a lot easier to build everything locally and run it, it's faster, and you don't have to worry about those other jerks screwin' up your code (until checkin time) :D
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