camera scanner access over network

So lets say you connect a camera, scanner, smart phone, or some other similar device to a Windows 7 machine via USB. It shows up in Windows Explorer under "Portable Devices". From there you can double click on it and if there is any type of folder structure, you can continue browsing until you reach the files. The "Path" in the Explorer address bar is something like "Computer\Device" - which obviously is not a UNC path or anything.

So the question is.... is there anyway to remotely access the files on this device using some sort of UNC path (and if so what IS it)? There have been instances when this would have been handy.
rkmcswainAsked:
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Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVEDeveloperCommented:
It depends on the USB setting. There are two types:

MTP (Media Transfer Protocol): This is a special media USB mode and is used to transfer media files and their metadata.

MSC (Mass Storage Class): This is the standard USB mode and is used to make it storage.

Many devices like cameras, phones, and MP3 players default to MTP mode when you connect them to USB ports. They assume you want to transfer media. You need to change to MSC mode to view them as a drive. I don't know how to do this on an iPhone or if it's even possible (the iPhone is a strange beast and, afaik, is strongly tied to iTunes for USB connectivity), but my Lyra X3030 has a USB setting that allows you to configure it for MPT or MSC, and my Android phone provides a pull down notification shade that lets you mount the drive, essentially implementing MSC. Regards, Joe
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Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVEDeveloperCommented:
When you attach the device via USB, you should then be able to map the memory (both built-in and SD card) as a drive. How you do this depends on the OS. For example, with my Android smarthphone, there used to be a mechanism called Mount Drive. I guess they decided that wasn't user-friendly terminology, so they changed it in later releases to say Turn on USB Storage. Anyway, when you do that, Windows now recognizes it as a drive letter and then you can share it on the network, as with any other attached drive. I just tested this by connecting my Droid to a W7 machine, telling it to Turn on USB Storage, sharing the drive (which it made F), setting permissions, and then having no problem accessing it across the network from an XP machine. Here's a screen shot:

mounting and sharing Droid
Regards, Joe
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rkmcswainAuthor Commented:
I should have mentioned this in the original post, but some devices do not operate this way. The only thing I have to test with at the moment is an iPhone and it simply shows up as described in the original post.  I've tried going to Disk Manager and it does not show up at all, so you can't map a drive letter to it.

It just stands to reason that if a local Windows Explorer can see it, a remote one should also (with the proper permissions of course).

Thanks.
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rkmcswainAuthor Commented:
Thanks. That is all good information, and it makes sense.... I just keep falling back on the fact that if a local Win Explorer can see it, so should a remote one. I mean what if you wanted to use the USB on one machine to transfer media to another......?

I guess I'll just have to remote into the other machine, when available....

Thanks again.
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LeeTutorretiredCommented:
This question has been classified as abandoned and is closed as part of the Cleanup Program. See the recommendation for more details.
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