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SBS2011 to SBS2011 migration failure

Posted on 2011-09-20
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Last Modified: 2013-12-02
Hi,

An IT administrator contacted me and said that he had recently done a failed SBS2011 to SBS2011 migration. The reason of the migration was to migrate to new hardware.

The source server has been prepared and the destination server had sucessfully been installed. However somehow the destination server crashed and all the data was wiped (don't ask me how). No wizards has been run.

There is no backup of the destination server.

Now to the question: What steps should be taken from here?
From what i understand the server has been joined to the domain and FSMO roles has been transfered. How can we clean up the source server?

Thanks
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Question by:ants-servertech
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Cliff Galiher earned 250 total points
ID: 36565192
In an ideal world, the best option now would be to make a separate data only backup (exchange, sharepoint, SQL, file, etc) to capture any and all changes that have occurred since the migration. Then restore a bare metal backup from before the migration (reverting AD) then restoring the data to the more recent point in time. This would, as you can imagine, result in a consistent server with *no* data loss, and since AD is now pre-migration, you can simply perform the migration again as if the failed one never happened.

As always, *ALSO* make a full bare metal backup before starting so that, if the restore of the older version fails, or integrating the newer data into the older restore fails, you have a way to revert back.

Less ideally, you *can* try to manually clean up AD. This involves using ntdsutil to seize back the transferred roles and remove *all* references to the new server. Then scrub DNS, ADUC, and Active Directory Sites and Services. This *does* work, but if any data is missed, attempting another migration will fail, so as difficult as doing backups and restores sounds, this is even more difficult to pull off properly.

If you aren't comfortable performing these tasks, call in a migration specialist that you trust in your area. Always a viable option.

-Cliff
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