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What are the restrictions on static methods in a generic class?

I'm trying to understand this paragraph in my book. I guess this means that in a class like MyClass<T>, a static method cannot refer to T. Is that correct? Why are other methods allowed to refer to T while static methods are not?

"In a generic class, static methods and fields cannot refer to the class's type variables, since, after erasure, there are no type variables. Further, since there is only one raw class, static fields are shared among the class's generic instantiations"
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shampouya
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shampouya
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for_yanCommented:

Read what I posted yesterday in your question about the erasure.
At runtime there is no parameter T in the class.
So no matter whit is T all classes conatining T will be lbaleed the same raw class
And static mnthod is a property of a raw class istself- not of the instance of a class
that's why the peoprty of calass itself cannot depebnd on T

In the inastance of a class T is defined before the object is created at ruyntime - but static method does not depend on the instance and
is created at the loading of the class - so uit is logical that it cannot depend on T
 
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for_yanCommented:
This is from yesterday's question which has direct connection to this question:

The compiler translates generic and parameterized types by a technique called type erasure .  Basically, it elides all information related to type parameters and type arguments. For instance, the parameterized type List<String> is translated to type List , which is the so-called raw type .  The same happens for the parameterized type List<Long> ; it also appears as List in the bytecode.

After translation by type erasure, all information regarding type parameters and type arguments has disappeared. As a result, all instantiations of the same generic type share the same runtime type, namely the raw type.

Example (printing the runtime type of two parameterized types):

    System.out.println("runtime type of ArrayList<String>: "+ne w ArrayList<String>().getClass());
    System.out.println("runtime type of ArrayList<Long>  : "+new ArrayList<Long>().g etClass());

    prints:   runtime type of ArrayList<String> : class java.util. ArrayList
          runtime type of ArrayList<Long>   : class java.util. ArrayList


So this is all because static method depends only on class itslef not on its instance - and class itself on runtime
already does not know about any T - this type in the instance already resolved.
Well, it seems clear to me - ask questions if you have any doubts.
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shampouyaAuthor Commented:
Oh ok so here is my understanding:

The generic type T in MyClass<T> is relevant when instance methods of MyClass are called through instances of MyClass. But when static methods in MyClass are called, they cannot depend on T because static methods are not called through objects, and thus they only have access to the raw features of the class, not the generic features.

Is that correct?
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for_yanCommented:
Yes, I think your statemnt is correct.

Basically when JVM deals with the class - this class is alreday has dependency on
T resolved. and if T would be in the static method - then it would not be possible.

All this stuff about generics is on compiler level only - not on the runtime levbel - this explains
all these restrictions
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shampouyaAuthor Commented:
thanks
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