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Regular Expression Help

Hi

Looking for a regExp that matches on any number of uppercase alphas followed by any number of digits OR just the uppercase alphas

ADOG //good
ADOG1 // good
ADOG11 //good

ADOG1A //bad
1ADOG //bad
AD1G //bad

thanks
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Molko
Asked:
Molko
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1 Solution
 
for_yanCommented:
I think this should match:

[A-Z0-9]+
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for_yanCommented:
sorry didn't understand
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for_yanCommented:
this should match
[A-Z]+[0-9]*$
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for_yanCommented:
No, it actually matches too much
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for_yanCommented:
       Pattern p10 =  Pattern.compile("^[A-Z]+[0-9]*\\z");
        Matcher m10 = p10.matcher("ADOG11");
        if (m10.find())System.out.println("match");
          else  System.out.println("no match");
           m10 = p10.matcher("ADOG1A");


          if(m10.find())System.out.println("match");
        else  System.out.println("no match");

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match
no match

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for_yanCommented:
The above I already tested
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MolkoAuthor Commented:
You think  "^[A-Z]+[0-9]*\\z" is good ? what does the \\z mean ?
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for_yanCommented:
\\z means the end of string
and ^ means the begiining of it
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MolkoAuthor Commented:
I thought $ meant end of string ?
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for_yanCommented:
ADOG  matched
ADOG1  matched
ADOG11  matched
ADOG1A not   matched
1ADOG not   matched
AD1G not   matched

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for_yanCommented:
Yes, it is another variant, I think it would work with $ also
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for_yanCommented:
without these beginning and end
ADOG1A  is matching, because it is the last "A" which is matching
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for_yanCommented:
This is testing all of your examples
        String [] toTest = {
                "ADOG",
                "ADOG1", // good
                "ADOG11", //good

                "ADOG1A", //bad
                "1ADOG", //bad
                "AD1G" //bad

        };

       Pattern p10 =  Pattern.compile("^[A-Z]+[0-9]*\\z");

        for(String st: toTest){
            Matcher mt = p10.matcher(st);

            if(mt.find()){
                System.out.println(st+ "  matched");


            }
            else
              System.out.println(st+ " not   matched");
        }

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The output see above
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for_yanCommented:
   String [] toTest = {
                "ADOG",
                "ADOG1", // good
                "ADOG11", //good

                "ADOG1A", //bad
                "1ADOG", //bad
                "AD1G" //bad

        };

       Pattern p10 =  Pattern.compile("^[A-Z]+[0-9]*$");

        for(String st: toTest){
            Matcher mt = p10.matcher(st);

            if(mt.find()){
                System.out.println(st+ "  matched");


            }
            else
              System.out.println(st+ " not   matched");
        }

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Output
ADOG  matched
ADOG1  matched
ADOG11  matched
ADOG1A not   matched
1ADOG not   matched
AD1G not   matched

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without $ or \z in the end of regex, though, ADOG1A will also be matching
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CEHJCommented:
>>... on any number of uppercase alphas

'Any' would of course include zero - is that your intention?
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MolkoAuthor Commented:
Hi,

'any' as in more than zero. There should be at least one alpha
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for_yanCommented:
That's how I understood it.
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CEHJCommented:
>>any' as in more than zero. There should be at least one alpha

In that case, all you need is
boolean valid = input.matches("[A-Z]+\\d*");

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for_yanCommented:

@CEHJ,

Of course you can use \d instedd of [0-9] - these are equivalent,
but you need to put ^ and $ at the start and the end, as otherwise it will match all
six of the examples above

           String [] toTest = {
                "ADOG",
                "ADOG1", // good
                "ADOG11", //good

                "ADOG1A", //bad
                "1ADOG", //bad
                "AD1G" //bad

        };

       //Pattern p10 =  Pattern.compile("^[A-Z]+[0-9]*$");

        Pattern p10 =  Pattern.compile("[A-Z]+\\d*");

        for(String st: toTest){
            Matcher mt = p10.matcher(st);

            if(mt.find()){
                System.out.println(st+ "  matched");


            }
            else
              System.out.println(st+ " not   matched");
        }

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ADOG  matched
ADOG1  matched
ADOG11  matched
ADOG1A  matched
1ADOG  matched
AD1G  matched

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CEHJCommented:
>>as otherwise it will match all six of the examples above

That's incorrect. All you need is the below

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
	String [] toTest = {
	    "ADOG",
	    "ADOG1", // good
	    "ADOG11", //good

	    "ADOG1A", //bad
	    "1ADOG", //bad
	    "AD1G" //bad

	};
	final String PATTERN = "[A-Z]+\\d*";
	for(String st: toTest){
	    System.out.printf("%s valid? %b\n", st, st.matches(PATTERN));
	}
    }
}

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for_yanCommented:
well, with ^ and $ it works with all variants
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CEHJCommented:
>>it works with all variants

So does the simpler code i posted
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MolkoAuthor Commented:
Cheers
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CEHJCommented:
:)
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