Solved

Dell server - hard drive partition recommendation

Posted on 2011-09-20
4
251 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-12
Hi,

I just ordered a Dell server for a client and it was configured with
2 300GB drives in RAID 1
4 600GB drives in RAID 5

However Dell have partitioned the RAID 1 drive as two partitions, a C drive as 40GB and the other 260GB as D drive (So the raid 5 is all on the E drive)

Already there is only 8GB free on the C drive. From experience I've had the occasional issue which has eaten up space on the C Drive and I would rather have more.

So I'm thinking I will just delete the D drive partition. Expand the C partition to take up the remaining space. And then re-label the E drive to the D drive.

But before I do this I just wanted opinions. Is there a good valid reason to keep the drive congigured as Dell did, or perhaps just configure to the C drive to have additional say, 100GB, but still keep a separate partition on the RAID1 drive?

Any opinions?


Thanks in advance.
0
Comment
Question by:afflik1923
  • 2
4 Comments
 
LVL 31

Accepted Solution

by:
Frosty555 earned 250 total points
ID: 36569275
It depends on what you want your server to do. Dell probably shipped it that way so that a standard server with only a single RAID1 partition could have a C:\ drive for OS files, and a D:\ drive for data, to help facilitate backing up the data separate from the OS.

In your case I think you probably are going to put your client data on the RAID5 (E:\ drive). So I don't see any reason to keep the RAID1 split into two partitions.

And I wholeheartedly agree that 40gb is not enough for a sustainable Windows Server 2008 installation. All too many times I have had my C:\ drive balloon into the 100+gb range all on its own because of thinks like Volume Shadow Copy services (the C:\system volume information folder growing wildly), temp files, winsxs etc.
0
 

Author Comment

by:afflik1923
ID: 36569614
OK I've done it. I deleted the original D drive and expanded C so now uses the 300GB. Only took a few moments.
This is this a better solution.
Thanks
0
 
LVL 32

Assisted Solution

by:PowerEdgeTech
PowerEdgeTech earned 250 total points
ID: 36899832
The size of the OS partition is a selectable option during the order.  You can set it at 20, 40, 80, or the entire drive, so there is no reason to keep your original choice, if you have now decided that it would be better as something else (or if you did not configure it before).  With Server 2008 and newer, as you have found out, changing these sizes is very easy.

0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:afflik1923
ID: 36930332
Many thanks
0

Featured Post

Free learning courses: Active Directory Deep Dive

Get a firm grasp on your IT environment when you learn Active Directory best practices with Veeam! Watch all, or choose any amount, of this three-part webinar series to improve your skills. From the basics to virtualization and backup, we got you covered.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Restoring deleted objects in Active Directory has been a standard feature in Active Directory for many years, yet some admins may not know what is available.
When we purchase storage, we typically are advertised storage of 500GB, 1TB, 2TB and so on. However, when you actually install it into your computer, your 500GB HDD will actually show up as 465GB. Why? It has to do with the way people and computers…
This tutorial will walk an individual through the steps necessary to join and promote the first Windows Server 2012 domain controller into an Active Directory environment running on Windows Server 2008. Determine the location of the FSMO roles by lo…
This tutorial will show how to configure a single USB drive with a separate folder for each day of the week. This will allow each of the backups to be kept separate preventing the previous day’s backup from being overwritten. The USB drive must be s…

861 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question