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group policy management console

Posted on 2011-09-21
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Last Modified: 2012-05-12
I have an xp workstation joined to a domain and I want to see what group policies are being applied to which users/workstation. Is the best tool to do this GPMC? Is it as easy as installing it and it will automatically resolve the GP's in the domain - or is it a bit more detailed than that?

Another worry is my domain account is just domain user - will this limit what I can see in GPMC or just what I can do in GPMC?

Thanks
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Question by:pma111
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Krzysztof Pytko earned 500 total points
ID: 36572954
GPMC is the only one MS GUI tool for that. By default domain user has read permission. so you will see everything. You won't be able to change/modify anything.

Other useful tools for GPOs are:
- gpresult in command-line
- RSoP.msc snap-in

Regards,
Krzysztof
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by:pma111
ID: 36572959
So its as easy as installing the software on this machine and that will point to where the GP objects are stored? A bit like AD users and comps does?
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by:pma111
ID: 36572964
Is gpresult and Rsop just resultant set of policy due for the workstation to see what policies was applied? If so why couldnt you just view them from GPMC? Why would you need to also run it on their workstation if you can see the setting that is going to be applied from the GPMC?
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by:Krzysztof Pytko
ID: 36572966
Exactly! :)
You can downloaded the latest GPMC for 2003/XP from
http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=21895

Krzysztof
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by:Krzysztof Pytko
ID: 36572979
GPResult and RSoP displays only settings which are taken from Group Policies whereas GPMC shows only which GPO is applied to which OU and you can view particular GPO settings. So, first 2 tools shows only applied settings (in case of policy config, you will see appled setting(s), in GPMC you will see only GPOs applying order)

Krzysztof
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by:pma111
ID: 36572992
Can you go into a GP in GPMC and see the individual settings - or just the GP name?
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by:Krzysztof Pytko
ID: 36573003
Individual settings and GP names :) Group Policy name is visible as link into an OU or as policy in Group Policy Objects container. When you select particular GP, then on the right pane you have "Settings" tab where you would be able to review all of set up settings. In case you wish to modify anything, you need to have appropriate permissions to edit GP

Krzysztof
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by:pma111
ID: 36573034
Thanks again iSiek - appreciate your help.

If you have time could you cast your eyes on this question?:

http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Microsoft_Operating_Systems/Windows/Q_27319316.html
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by:Krzysztof Pytko
ID: 36573051
You're welcome :)
OK, I'm going to read this post, now :)

Krzysztof
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