How to host my own domain.

Hello

I am studying in I.T and there is something I quite don't understand yet.

Let say I have a very small business.

Probably, the best solution to own a domain is to buy a domain from 1&1, GoDaddy, etc. With this I have a limited control on my DNS, i can redirect subdomain names to my IP and port forward it to an small internal server or NAS...

But lets say that my company will grow fast, and I want to  buy 2-3 servers of HP or DELL and host my own DNS, MAIL, FILE server to get full control. But how do i make my domain to get published on the internet ? For example, how do i register myowncompany.com

I have already used DNS server before on virtual machines and made zones and everything. I am familiar with Active Directory and Exchange Server. It was for educational use only, so they  never showed us how to register the domains we were working on.

Thanks
metraonAsked:
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DrDave242Commented:
Regardless of who's hosting your DNS, your domain name still has to be registered with GoDaddy or some other registrar.  I don't currently have a registered domain name, so I can't say for sure, but I'm pretty sure registrars will let you specify your own DNS server addresses if you would prefer to host it rather than letting them handle it.  In fact, here's GoDaddy's help page on the subject:

http://help.godaddy.com/article/664

As for hosting mail servers, file servers, and whatnot, that'll depend on exactly what you want to do.  To host a mail server, for example, you'll need to configure an MX record for it in the public DNS, and you'll most likely want an SPF record as well.  (You'll also need to configure a PTR record for it, but that's handled by your ISP.)  There are obviously considerations outside of DNS too, but getting into all of that could take a long time.  Do you have any specific questions about that sort of thing?
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Chris DentPowerShell DeveloperCommented:
I strongly advise you stick with hosted DNS services, keeping public DNS services well away from your AD domain (assuming you have one). An AD Domain Controller is not a suitable platform for public DNS services.

On the other hand, if you were hosting public DNS services as a dedicated server you'd do this:

1. Configure a DNS server, adding any zones you want to host
2. Register the zones with an ISP, or other registrar
3. Talk to / head to the interface for your registrar then change the Name Servers to the public IP address of your DNS server

However, as I mentioned above, if you're operating in the context of a small business using AD and e-mail services you don't want to start running public domain names off your server. In most situations you simply don't need to, while AD needs a domain name it doesn't need to be a public one, you might use myowncompany.local, or corp.myowncompany.com, or ad.myowncompany.com, and so on. None of those need to be publicly configured or registered.

Chris
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metraonAuthor Commented:
But if i host a AD with abdasa.local for example and I install an email server on my network, how will the emails will be linked to bob@mycompagny.com to bob@absada.local...

Thanks
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DrDave242Commented:
That's the job of the e-mail server software.  Microsoft Exchange, the only mail server I have any experience with, lets you specify what mail domains it should receive and process messages for, and I would imagine all mail server software would have to provide that same functionality.
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