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I need to evaluate the physical, logical processors and cores together with memory used. Could you give me some tips on this?

Hi there;

I need to evaluate the physical, logical processors and cores together with memory used. Could you give me some tips on this?

What I mean is that what is the difference between phyical and logical processors?

What I am doing is that I have to do an implementation for queueing for a process. So, should the number of the cores be evaluated in the first place against physical processors, then logical processors then memory itself?

How can I proceed?

For the record, I am implementing my program to assess the queue in C# and the target environment is again a Windows machine.

Kind regards.
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jazzIIIlove
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jazzIIIlove
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3 Solutions
 
CallandorCommented:
The difference between physical and logical processors is usually whether a cpu is hyperthreading or not.  In the old days, each socket had a separate processor, and there was a 1 to 1 correspondence between physical and logical processors.  With the advent of multiple cores in a single socket, this is no longer true.

Each core is considered a physical processor, because from a computational perspective, there is little difference between two cores and two single cpus in two sockets.
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jazzIIIloveAuthor Commented:
So with the light of your comment, in my application, should the number of the cores be evaluated in the first place against physical processors, then logical processors then memory itself?

It seems that number of cores checking reflects as same as the number of physical processors. Isn't it?

Kind regards.
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CallandorCommented:
>It seems that number of cores checking reflects as same as the number of physical processors. Isn't it?

Yes - consider each core to be the equivalent of a single physical processor.
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jazzIIIloveAuthor Commented:
Yes, but what about my other questions?
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CallandorCommented:
Are you looking for C# programming help?  I tried to answer your hardware-related questions.
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jazzIIIloveAuthor Commented:
I mean in which order should i distribute my resources against multiple clients?

Regards.
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CallandorCommented:
It depends on what your clients need and what you have available - if they're just like thin clients logging into a server, then you are looking for an algorithm similar to what an OS does to manage multiple requests by parceling out resources.  That is not a simple question to answer - universities teach whole courses on this, so is that why you are asking this?
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jazzIIIloveAuthor Commented:
Hi there;

Yes. I need some ideas or tips regarding the parameters indicating this distribution for thin clients.

Kind regards.
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