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cat /proc/meminfo

Posted on 2011-09-21
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Hi,

I got this when I did a cat/proc/meminfo

Slab:              16124 kB
SReclaimable:       6764 kB
SUnreclaim:         9360 kB
Could anyone tell me what this means ? Thanks.
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Question by:zizi21
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Slab: in-kernel data structures cache
SReclaimable: Part of Slab, that might be reclaimed, such as caches
SUnreclaim: Part of Slab, that cannot be reclaimed on memory pressure

http://www.mjmwired.net/kernel/Documentation/filesystems/proc.txt
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by:zizi21
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Thank you.
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by:Papertrip
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Thank you.
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No, thank you! :)
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