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oracle - multiple databases and multiple listeners

Posted on 2011-09-21
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Last Modified: 2012-05-12
Hi Team,

I have a problem with oracle 11g on RHEL 5.6. I did create two new databases and schema. when I try to connect I get "TNS listener does not know of SID ....." not sure the exact message. I figure out that I should set up a listener. Could you tell us how to set up new listeners for two databases so they can up and running?
I also want to access these two databases with SID and Service_name.

Please help

thanks
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Question by:luser9999
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7 Comments
 
LVL 69

Expert Comment

by:Qlemo
ID: 36579060
I can give only generic advice ATM.
You set up one listener only per machine. All instances will try to register automatically with that listener, but that might last some time (several minutes), or require a instance restart. If you want to change that, edit the listener.ora file - read the manual regarding that.
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LVL 76

Expert Comment

by:slightwv (䄆 Netminder)
ID: 36580077
You only need one listener, one listener.ora and one tnsnames.ora.

By chance are you coming from a SQL Server background?

Do you really need two databases?

Please post your listener.ora and tnsnames.ora files and the instance names of your databases.
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Author Comment

by:luser9999
ID: 36708600
So only one listener for all databases.

I need to two databases/schemas

do you think one database with many schemas will work? (In mysql I usally create two different databases , one for Bug tracking tool and another database for CMS)

I will post those shortly
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LVL 69

Assisted Solution

by:Qlemo
Qlemo earned 250 total points
ID: 36708643
It depends. Using different schemas is fine if you want to keep administration simple and a shared memory scenario, that is the instance dynamically decides which of the "databases" to give more memory.
Using different instances is better if you want to keep the data strictly separated from each other, or have more control over how memory is split between the databases.
Remember: Oracle allocates the memory you configure it to allocate, no matter if the memory is needed or not. So 2x 2GB instances might perform worse than 1x 4GB instance.

I would start with a single instance, as that is a much simpler case for administration and maintenance. Should you get into performance issues, splitting it into separate instances is an option.
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Assisted Solution

by:slightwv (䄆 Netminder)
slightwv (䄆 Netminder) earned 250 total points
ID: 36709079
The design is up to you.  You need to look at the individual requirements of the systems.

For example, what happens if a developer runs a bad command in their schema that fills up resources.  Can the other database become unavailable?

You also have backup and recovery concerns.

If the databases are in no way related to one another I might be tempted to build two.  Although this is outside the scope of the question asked.


Back to the question:  
>>So only one listener for all databases.

Yes.  One listener can handle many databases.
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Accepted Solution

by:
luser9999 earned 0 total points
ID: 37029574
I will work on it, thanks
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Author Closing Comment

by:luser9999
ID: 37052416
thanks
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