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StackOverflowError

A customer is receiving a StackOverflowError with a 1024 lines of the following:
at java.awt.AWTEventMulticaster.mouseMoved(AWTEventMulticaster.java:312)

This happens over and over.

This is being reported by a customer and I am at a loss as to which component is causing it and I can't seem to duplicate it myself.  What might be causing this or what should I be looking for?

Thanks.
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gpman65
Asked:
gpman65
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1 Solution
 
stachenovCommented:
Usually this happens because of infinite recursion, but I can't think of any possible way to cause infinite recursion with this class. Well, except for subclassing it and passing "this" to the superclass constructor, but that's not something easily done by mistake. When used in normal way, add() functions create nodes at the root of the listener tree, and there is no way to change deeper nodes to point above themselves, thus creating an event loop.

Perhaps it is not an infinite recursion, but just too much listeners in the tree? Although it is quite hard to imagine having that many listeners.

Or it could be that one of the listeners calls the root listener recursively. But then that particular listener would turn up in the stack trace as well, which apparently isn't happening. Of course it is possible that it also adds another listener at the top of the tree and only then calls the (new) top listener. This sounds too crazy to be true, but it would lead to the tree constantly growing until it gets too large.

Sorry for being so vague, but it is hard to say more without more details about how multicasters are used.
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stachenovCommented:
Come to think of it, it is not necessary that listeners are added inside other listeners. The "too many listeners" case could be caused by something (anywhere in the program) periodically adding those listeners until the tree grows too large. So the first thing to check is all add() calls. How often are they called? Don't they add the same listeners again and again?

Another thing to do is to change the order of the arguments for add(). The thing is that the listeners are called in the order they are passed to add(). If the listener returned by the previous invocation of add() is passed first, then the event is first propagated down to the deepest node and then listeners are called while the stack "unwinds". The bad thing is that in this case all you get is those "AWTEventMulticaster.java:312" lines. On the other hand, if the root listener returned by add() is passed as the second argument, then it would call the latest listener first, then go down by one level, call the previous listener, and so on. The order would be reversed, but you'll see in the stack trace which listeners are being called, and that could mean easier debugging.
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for_yanCommented:
Are you running it in the same version of Java as your customer?
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stachenovCommented:
Regarding my last comment: even if the order of the listeners is reversed, you'll only see the listener that was called last, and only if you're lucky enough. Still, it is better than nothing I guess.
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gpman65Author Commented:
I found where I was adding the same listener over and over again.  I would not have expected a stackoverflow from this, but that does seem to be the cause.  Thanks.
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